Olympian Eric Liddell Carries the Torch: For Christ

Eric Liddell.
Hero.
A real hero.

Known as “The Flying Scotsman” (after the record-breaking locomotive), Eric Liddell was born in China, the son of Missionaries, on January 16, 1902. He was the son of Rev and Mrs. James Dunlop Liddell, who were Scottish missionaries with the London Missionary Society. He would die, in China, serving as a Missionary Teacher, on February 21, 1945.

His story, and his strong religious convictions, were the subject of the 1981 film Chariots of Fire, in which he is portrayed by fellow Scotsman Ian Charleson.

The year is 1924.
The Summer Olympics are being held in Paris, France. Eric Liddell is a favorite to win Gold. His best event, his specialty, the one which he was clearly the favorite to win, was the 100 Meter Race. It was the running of this race, his best event, which Eric refused to compete in … because the race was to be held on Sunday. The race would be won by Harold Abrahams, from Britain, in a time of 10.6 seconds, beating all the American favorites. Harold Abrahams’s father, Isaac, was a Jewish immigrant from Poland, and had settled in Bedford, with his Welsh Jewish wife, Esther Isaacs.

In the 1924 Paris Olympics, Eric would compete in the 400 Meter Race … which he won.

As he stepped to the line to compete in the 400 … an event which the Americans were favored to win … an American slipped Eric a piece of paper … On the paper was written a quote from 1 Samuel 2:30: “For them that honor me I will honor.”

I find this a fascinating piece of history, which I did not know, until I did the research for this writing. This quote from 1 Samuel was one of my Mom’s favorite verses, and one which I heard my Mom quote so many times, often over the telephone, that “God honors those who honor Him;” that, “I will honor those who honor Me.” Her repeated quote of this Scripture prompted us to use the quote from the verse as our business motto: “To Honor Those Who Honor Him.”

How did Eric Liddell do, as he raced around the Olympic track, carrying this quote from Scripture: He broke the Olympic and world records with a time of 47.6 seconds.

Again, this was 1924. The next year, 1925, Eric returned to China to serve as a missionary teacher. Aside from two furloughs in Scotland, he remained in China until his death, in a Japanese civilian internment camp, in 1945.

Eric Liddell died on February 21, 1945, five months before liberation. Langdon Gilkey, American theologian, would write, “The entire camp, especially its youth, was stunned for days, so great was the vacuum that Eric’s death had left.”
According to a fellow missionary, Liddell’s last words were, “It’s complete surrender,” in reference to how he had given his life to God.

Remember, in those 1924 Olympics in Paris, Eric Liddell had refused to compete in his best event, the 100 Meters, due to his strong beliefs and convictions. We go now, 56 years after the 1924 Paris Olympics, as fellow Scotsman Allan Wells won the 100 Meter Sprint at the 1980 Olympics, held in Moscow. When Allan Wells was asked, after his Moscow Olympic victory, if he had run the race in honor of Harold Abrahams, who was the last 100 Meter Olympic winner from Britain (in those Paris Olympics in 1924), who had died two years previously, Wells replied:
“No, I would prefer to dedicate this to Eric Liddell.”

I can’t think of a better representative of the Scripture of “Giving all to, and for, Christ.”

Eric Liddell.
Hero.
A real hero.

A special thanks to the Lights4God blog … for bringing this great story back to my memory. Here’s a direct link to the post which brought this back:
https://lights4god.wordpress.com/2012/01/16/eric-liddell-2/

Now, here’s a short biographical video which tells the story of Eric’s life, which features some great historical photographs, and quotes from Eric Liddell:

Two Videos: Christ the Redeemer Statue in Rio de Janeiro

The statue of Jesus Christ, known as “Christ the Redeemer,” in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, is the largest statue of Jesus in the
world, and is also the largest Art Deco statue in the world.
The statue is located at the peak of the Corcovado mountain, in the Tijuca Forest National Park, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
It is perhaps the most recognizable feature of any city in the world, and we should be seeing a lot of this statue in the
next several days … and … on network television ….

I don’t know really know how to describe it, and I am curious as to how the networks will handle what is the most iconic
image of Rio de Janeiro … how often will we hear the networks proclaiming, just saying the words, “Christ the Redeemer”

I was at work, and when I brought up the “Google” home page, there was an invitation at the bottom of the page to “See the
culture and history of Rio de Janeiro,” so, I clicked on it, and was treated to a slide-show featuring the Statue … but,
what impressed me the most about the slide-show was that it was done from a Christian viewpoint, speaking of how Jesus was
mankind’s Redeemer and Savior, as it told the story of the building of the Statue, and its history. That was yesterday, and,
today, that particular link (to the slide-show) was not offered … It couldn’t have been just for me, was it???

I had always been a “fan” of the Statue, and as a History fan, any landmark, especially historical landmarks, grab my
attention.

Like you, I have visited many cemeteries where a statue of Jesus was placed. Recently, I completed a personal mission to
visit the Tennessee-Georgia Memorial Cemetery, in Rossville, Georgia, which had a beautiful statue of Jesus. I can’t imagine
standing in front of this Statue, the “Christ the Redeemer” Statue in Rio de Janeiro, and how I would feel. Just thinking
about it, I can imagine myself looking up at “Him,” His gaze fixed on the landscape below … His arms outstretched … I see His gaze fixed on the landscape below … His arms outstretched … I can’t help but think about what this really represents … How He is, for real, looking down, seeing everything that happens … even to me … even to everyone in the world … How He sees … and His arms are outstretched …

I get it!
I really do.

How are the networks going to handle this representation? Will they just call it “there you see the iconic statue?” Will
they go so far as to say something like, “the iconic statue looking down over the city …” or, will they call it by name?
Will they utter the words, “Christ the Redeemer?”

Will they … will we … will the audience … recognize the representation?
Will they even show it? Call it by name?

How will the networks present “Christ the Redeemer” to the world?
I know Who ordains all things … What an “Olympic” opportunity …

I know we leave “Christ” out of a certain holiday …
Is it possible to leave “Christ the Redeemer” out of the Olympics?

The first video has many beautiful images of the Statue …

This second video, for History folks like me, has the history of the Statue …It is from
“Jerry the Idea Wizard” and details the history …

Video: Thanks Giving: Warriors for Freedom’s “Remember the 22”

I was getting ready to write a new chapter in our “Wealth Stored for the Righteous” series, where we have examined so many blessings we have already received … already possess … and, can enjoy right now.

Granted, so many of those blessings we enjoy are directly a result of where we live … the freedoms we enjoy … just by having the privilege of living where we do. So many freedoms we seem, daily, to take for granted. Enjoying the freedoms … yet, sadly, not thinking about how we got those freedoms … and, at what cost, what sacrifices were made, in order for us to be blessed with freedoms. How often are we even thankful for just the privilege to live where we do? The freedom to do so many things … how sacred a privilege it is to vote … to see … regardless of “which way it goes,” a change in government without violence … a peaceful transition …

Our Christian liberty came at great cost, and, so, also, does the opportunity to live in peace, in the midst of a world surrounded by chaos. Our freedoms exist, and are maintained, as a direct result of the men and women who have served, and are serving now, as veterans. Let’s not forget that. Let’s not forget them. Let’s not forget, period.

My father, like many of your fathers, is a United States Veteran. My relatives, like many of your relatives, served their country. When I think about their sacrifices, it seems a small thing to just say “thank you.” I think the Veterans would think otherwise. I think they would think a simple “thank you” would be a big thing. I think they would, in turn … thank you.
I remember working with a young Veteran in a retail establishment. I remember how this young man, every time he encountered a customer who was a Veteran, would say, “Thank you for your service.” I remember the sincerity in his voice, as he addressed his fellow Veterans. He knew what it was like. He knew what they went through. He had recently returned from serving overseas. Serving in the midst of a war. Serving his country. Volunteering to serve, at tremendous personal risk, “over there.” I must be honest: I can’t remember this man’s name, but I remember him, vividly doing that. I also remember the stories he told me of what it was really like “over there.” I still quote from his stories. He has since gone on to seek elected public service.

While looking for my notes for a new chapter, I came across this video, which aired on the CBS Television Network, over the Thanksgiving Holiday, and aired as part of their NFL coverage of the Thanksgiving football games. By the way, when was the last time you were thankful for the opportunity to watch “free” television? By “Free TV,” I’m referring to broadcast channels, and this includes radio … which are not directly controlled by government … or, political factions. While I can hear the answers to that question (about political bias, perhaps), please understand the concept.

This was a video to promote the “Warriors for Freedom” and their “Remember the 22” campaign.
I’d like to share that video with you. The reason for the “22” will be explained.
This also explains about teamwork, and “We got through war by helping one another. We gotta get through back home by helping one another.”

The Warriors for Freedom Foundation (WFF) is a non-profit, tax exempt organization that provides support to our nation’s heroes and their families. They seek to assist veterans as they transition from military life to civilian life. For military servicemen and women physically wounded in combat, or dealing with mental health issues, it is difficult, if not impossible, to return to the same lives they had before.

Here’s a link to Warriors for Freedom Foundation (WFF) website:
https://www.warriorsforfreedom.org/who-we-are/

Here’s a link to The Warriors For Freedom “Remember the 22” Website:
https://www.warriorsforfreedom.org/rememberingthe22/
Let’s just not forget.
Let’s remember.

Blessings to you, and your family,
Ted

Founder/President
Freedom Unlimited Resources

Returning Home from the “Country:” Tim McGraw and “Don’t Take the Girl”

Carol and I just returned from a trip to Georgia, which brought with it many tears, as well as laughter, and unforgettable moments. I’ll try to write on these as soon as possible. The “tears” part will take some time to get the words together …

How blessed we are.
Period.

We are so blessed to have many readers from all over the world. I try to never forget that our friends are located “everywhere.” When we feature a video, we always remember that many in our “audience” have never been exposed to certain artists, or maybe even types of music, like, maybe Southern Gospel, or Country music. This is true “both at home and abroad.”

There is one “common denominator” with every video, or artist, we’ve shared. The same rule applies to a video, or a writing, we share:
If it blesses us, it will bless others.

I’d like to share a video with you which … well … may fall into each of these categories for many of you. I’ve had this “on file” for a while, and, maybe, since I have just had a “refresher course” on the true meaning of “family,” it seems like a good time to share this one.

This is Tim McGraw, and his recording of “Don’t Take the Girl.”

“Don’t Take the Girl” is a song written by Craig Martin and Larry W. Johnson. It was released in March 1994 as the second single from his album “Not a Moment Too Soon.” The song was McGraw’s fifth single overall, and his first number-one single on the Hot Country Songs chart. It reached number one on the Canadian country charts as well, and it was also a successful pop song, reaching number 17 on the Billboard Hot 100. This was McGraw’s second music video. It was directed by Sherman Halsey.

Samuel Timothy “Tim” McGraw has been married to singer Faith Hill since 1996, and is the son of the late baseball player Tug McGraw. I was a fan of Tug McGraw’s, and, just a couple of days ago, when I was having a conversation about Tim McGraw … I called him, “Tug.” Couldn’t help it … I was a big fan of his father …

Tim McGraw’s “Soul2Soul II Tour” with Faith Hill is the highest grossing tour in country music history, and one of the top 5 among all genres of music.

One final note before I go to the video, and, I share this in honor of Carol, and all our friends of Italian heritage:
In acknowledgement of Tim McGraw’s grandfather’s Italian heritage, Tim McGraw was honored by the National Italian American Foundation (NIAF) in 2004, receiving the NIAF Special Achievement Award in Music during the Foundation’s 29th Anniversary Gala.

Yeah!!!!!!!

The last several days, as we traveled, I have tuned the radio up and down, and was excited to hear both Gospel and Country … sorry … had to tune away from some Country songs … been guests at two great Country Concerts (front row!), and, well, realized how much I loved live “Country” music … and, missed it …

It had been so long since I heard the names:
Jimmy Johnson
Tommy Thompson
My best friend Bo

And, phrase and lines like:
“Someday you’ll change your mind”
“Picture show”
“Johnny hits his knees and
Then he prayed”
Here’s Tim McGraw and the official video of “Don’t Take the Girl”

Keeping Up With John Adams/Thomas Jefferson/The Stone Library/ Just “Keeping Up” (Remembering July 4th, 1826)

I can’t believe I used that title …

I have always considered John Adams to be the most under-rated President we’ve had, if I may use that term.
And … Abigail Adams … incredible …
When I think of people “ahead of their time,” I always place Abigail at the top of the list.

One of the great thrills Carol and I have had is the opportunity to visit the John Adams birthplace, on Franklin Street in Quincy, Massachusetts. On the same property is the birthplace of John Quincy Adams, their son, and 6th United States President. I also consider John Quincy Adams the most intelligent President we’ve had, with his learning and ability to speak so many languages.

We have visited “Peacefield,” the home and farm purchased in 1787 by John Adams, and lived in by their son, as well. It is also lovingly called “The Old House.” What a thrill to visit “the Library out back.” What a thrill to step into that Library! The Library! The Stone Library, built in 1873, contains more than 12,000 books that belonged to the family.

Here is an excerpt from the Will of John Quincy Adams, dated January 18, 1847:

“I give and bequesth my library of books, my manuscript books and papers, and those of my father, and all of my family pictures…to my son, Charles Francis Adams, trusting that his mother shall at all times have the use of any of the books in the library at her discretions; and I recommend to my said son…to cause a building to be erected, made fire-proof, in which to keep the said library, books, documents, and manuscripts safe…and I especially recommend …that he will, as far as may be in his power, keep them together as one library…”

Take it from someone who just spent, on Saturday, during what others call “Summer Vacation,” seven hours working inside a High School Library … If you get a chance to see “The Stone Library” …

Carol and I also have visited the crypt, underneath the church, which is the final resting place of John Adams, Abigail Adams, John Quincy Adams, and Charlotte Adams. There just aren’t words to describe what it was like, being there. Standing there. I can still feel it.
It was a trip, made with our Pastor and his Wife, which we will never forget. The images just won’t leave.
I’m grateful for that.

This is another one of those great trips we’ve taken, and is “on the list” to share photos. We often get requests from friends who have joined us on some of these trips, who keep asking us, “When are you going to put together the video” or slide show, etc. Or, “When are you going to send us the pictures?” Even on trips when we’ve left the United States, we haven’t “gotten around yet” to sharing the stories or pictures from these trips. We usually don’t mention our trips publicly, but, on occasion, I’ll slip up and say something like, “Yeah, I remember seeing something like that in South America” or something, which is always met with something like, “I didn’t know you went to …”

One day … we’ll get around to it, I’m sure.
I always feel like I should be talking/sharing about something else besides us.

So, we’ll try to do better with sharing. If it’s any indication, this trip to the Adams Homestead … with our Pastor and Wife … was something like 12 years ago … or, longer …

I still consider the book “John Adams,” by David McCullough, the best biography I have read. David McCullough won the Pulitzer Prize for this (I was an early advocate) and for his book on Harry Truman. I must also mention in this writing how much I enjoyed his “1776” book. His descriptions of individuals knows no equal. I still vividly recall, from his book on John Adams, his physical descriptions of George Washington and Thomas Jefferson. I read the book, and wrote the excerpt below, well over 10 years ago. It is never “my time,” but “the time” to write or share, so, here now, is the excerpt I wrote over a decade ago:

On this day in early July, the week of our July 4th, I think back to reading this from the book on John Adams:

“That John Adams and Thomas Jefferson had died on the same day, and that it was, of all days, the Fourth of July, could not be seen as a mere coincidence.
‘It was a visible and palpable manifestation of Divine favor,’ wrote John Quincy Adams, in his diary that night, expressing what was felt and would be said again and again, everywhere the news spread.

In the weeks and months that followed, eulogies to Adams and Jefferson were delivered in all parts of the country and largely in the spirit that their departure should not be seen as a mournful event. They had lived to see the expanded greatness and consolidated strength of a pure republic. They had died amid the hosannas and grateful benedictions of a numerous happy and joyful people. And, on the nation’s 50th birthday. Which, said Daniel Webster in a speech in Boston, was proof from on high that our country and its benefactors are objects of His care. Webster’s eulogy, delivered at Faniel Hall, on August 2nd, lasted two hours.”

I just remembered … we’re flying out early Monday morning … to spend several days in the Deep South … I haven’t finished writing about our last trip there … several years ago …

Blessings,
Ted and Carol

P.S. Following 12 years of bitter silence caused by their disagreement over the role of the new federal government, these two old friends managed to reestablish the discourse of their younger years spent in Philadelphia, where they both served in the Continental Congress, and Paris, where they served together as ambassadors to France. In 1812, Benjamin Rush, a Patriot and physician from Philadelphia, initiated a renewed correspondence and reconciliation between his two friends and ex-presidents. The correspondence continued until Adams and Jefferson both died on July 4, 1826, the 50th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence that all three friends had signed in 1776.

John F. Kennedy Reads the Entire Text of “The Declaration of Independence”

How often we’ve written about our seemingly rare exposure to those great documents of United States history.
And, we raise the question of, “How often do we hear our National Anthem?”
“How often do we hear, or read, or say, the words of The Pledge of Allegiance?”
When was the last time we read, or heard, “The Declaration of Independence?”
The Preamble?
Etc.

I always seem to mention sporting events, and, I must be honest, the last time I heard our National Anthem was during the broadcast of the NBA Finals. The last time I heard our Pledge was on the last day of School.

When was the last time I heard “The Declaration of Independence?” Well … I feel I have an advantage over many. Our posting of “George Washington Reads The Declaration of Independence” over on our YouTube Channel, as a tribute to the way the History Channel closed out its mini-series, “Sons of Liberty,” has gained several thousand viewers, so I am exposed to this pretty often. Plus, the posting is popular over on our Blog and Facebook networks. So, I’m “around it” a lot. At least … I thought I was …

However … However … while I have heard “The Declaration of Independence” so many times … I realize this … I haven’t heard “The Declaration of Independence” … I’ve only heard a part of it … only a part of it … It would be, like, reading the first part of a book, and, then, saying, “I’ve read the book.” The Declaration has four distinct parts, and I must admit, I am only familiar, dare I say it, with the first part … the part we all call “The Declaration of Independence.”

For History:

On July 4, 1776, the Second Continental Congress voted to approve the Declaration of Independence inside the Pennsylvania State House (now Independence Hall). Four days later, on July 8, 1776, the citizens of Philadelphia were summoned to the State House Yard by the bells of the city. At noon, Colonel John Nixon publicly read the Declaration of Independence for the first time.

On July 4th, 1957, U.S. Senator John F. Kennedy read, and recorded “The Declaration of Independence.” It was the entire text, not just “the opening” which was read.

The previous summer, in 1956, At the Democratic National Convention, Tennessee Senator Estes Kefauver edged John F. Kennedy to become Adlai Stevenson’s running mate.

Just 5 years earlier, in November, 1952, John F. Kennedy had defeated Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. to win election to the United States Senate. In the presidential election, Dwight Eisenhower and his running mate, Richard Nixon, had defeated Adlai Stevenson.

In a little over four months after this recording, on November 27, 1957, Caroline Bouvier Kennedy was born.

I discovered this video several months ago, and have waited until now to share it. The credits for the source are contained within.
I have also added the link to The National Archives & Records Administration.

National Archives & Records Administration

 

Maine Memories: Cling Peaches and Bar “Harboring” Bible Study

It was one of those moments we never thought we would see … or hear.

Carol and I were traveling through the Maine coastline, trying to get in as many communities and lighthouses as possible in a few days’ time. We fell in love with Camden, Maine, and stood speechless as we experienced one of the most beautiful places on earth, the Pemaquid Point Light, in Bristol, Maine.

While we decided not to visit the area of Bar Harbor, Maine, wanting to devote several days there on a future trip (because it is the “Gateway to Acadia”), we spent much time in Boothbay Harbor. While there, in Boothbay Harbor, we just had to stop at a particular local restaurant … yes … based strictly upon the name … we just had to stop … as we stepped into “McSeagull’s Restaurant” … I remember thinking, as I read the sign overhead, “Eat, Drink & Flounder – Just for the Halibut!” … I thought, “You can’t make this stuff up” …

Not sure if I should mention one of the differences between restaurants in New England and other places … maybe things have changed, but, in New England, almost all restaurants are accompanied by the words “and Pub.” I remember, growing up in the South, that where you bought groceries, or where you ate, depended upon whether they served or sold alcohol or not. I can remember thinking, “Yes, but where do you buy your gas?” This is in reference to the only places open to buy gas were convenience stores, which sold more “stuff” behind the counter than just gasoline … Maybe that’s changed, as I can’t think of a grocery store “up here” that doesn’t at least sell beer. Restaurants the same. I know that in New Testament times, reading about Paul’s travels, for example, the word “tavern” is used. Why? Because these were the only businesses which were open. Often, as you travel, off-season, this is the same way in these United States.

Anyway, here we were, in Boothbay Harbor, at McSeagull’s, not in the “bar” area, but, certainly within sight and sound of the bar … as this was the only part of the restaurant which was open … as we heard something we never thought we would hear …

The date was November 6, 1971.
It was episode # 7, in the second season, of “All in the Family.”
This was the 20th episode of the series, and it was titled, “Edith’s Accident.”
The story was by Tom and Helen August, and the teleplay was written by Michael Ross and Bernie West.

Yes … “All in the Family.” To this day, one of our favorite shows. Somehow … that seems like a confession … I mention often that we don’t watch network television, but still watch the “old” shows on an “oldies” TV channel we get.

“Are you actually saying that you watch “All in the Family”?
Yes.

The show didn’t take place in today’s time. It took place in another time. A time we lived in, grew up in. And, shows like this take me back to those times. Hey … we love to watch “Sanford and Son” also … I think about this: People I know, who watch “All in the Family,” also love to watch “Sanford and Son.”
Interesting.
I remember when, on Friday night, we’d watch “The Brady Bunch,” then “The Partridge Family,” then “Sanford and Son,” then “Chico and the Man.” That’s a lineup, don’t you think? A common theme? Family. Have things changed? Changed on Friday nights? Think about it.

I remember my Mom laughing … laughing … I would be laying on the floor, in front of the television (black and white, of course), and Mama would be on the couch, behind me, and underneath the painting of Jesus praying in the Garden … laughing … and, on rare occasions, Daddy would come in … and, laugh … join in the laughter … I remember … I remember …

Yeah … I still remember that …

The “All in the Family” episode is entitled, “Edith’s Accident.” Edith, who doesn’t drive, or own a car, has a car accident. It is one of the most memorable episodes in TV history. Has there ever been a better cast? We all know their names. We all know the relationships.

This episode is also known by two words. Just two words:
“Cling Peaches.”

Edith has an accident, as a can of cling peaches … in heavy syrup … is propelled … into the hood of a car … Who owns the car? A Priest. Father Majeski, played by Barnard Hughes. Archie doesn’t trust Father Majeski, thinking he is taking advantage of Edith. In fact, he thinks Father Majeski is a fake … not really a Priest at all … Archie thinks the best way to catch this fraud is by tape-recording the meeting with Father Majeski:
Here’s the conversation:
Michael Stivic: “Archie, you’re violating his rights under the First Amendment.”
Archie Bunker: “Whose side are you on anyhow, huh? Look at me, I know I got a lot going against me, I’m white, I’m Protestant, I’m hard-working. Can’t you find one lousy amendment to protect me?”

Here’s the deal: Archie, to trick Father Majeski into proving he is a fake, comes up with a test to prove the Father’s legitimacy, by having Father Majeski quote a passage from the Bible.
I must paraphrase, but Archie introduces the test this way:

“Father Majeski, there, I was wondering if you could clear up a little bit of an argument we were having down at Kelsey’s Bar … we were discussing the Bible … it sometimes comes up between beers …”

Of course, Father Majeski answers the challenge, and quotes the Scripture in question …

Father Majeski has this exchange before leaving the house:
Father Majeski: “Go from the presence of the foolish man when thou perceivest not in him the lips of knowledge.”
Archie Bunker: “What does that mean?”
Father Majeski: “It means don’t waste your time arguing with an idiot!”

As part of one of the most memorable episodes in one of the most memorable series in television history, it was the “test” of Father Majeski which brings the most laughter to Carol and me. It is a favorite part of one of the favorite episodes of one of our favorite programs … I must admit that one of the reasons I can’t directly quote from this episode is that we have, literally, worn out the CD on which the episode appears. The whole program is just so funny, and it has become a personal joke between Carol and me, this “test.” We have watched this episode so many times, and it cracks us up every time. As with a lot of the comedy in this series … it’s funny because it is just so unreal, right???

Or, is it funny because it is so real?
I think we just discovered the reason for this show’s success.

Anyway, now, 45 years later …
45 years later …
45 years???

45 years later (we were so, so young when this episode first aired) … here we are, in a restaurant in Boothbay Harbor, Maine … I had ordered shrimp with my Pepsi … we were at a table over to the right of the bar … and, we could hear everything at the bar … Not that we were trying to listen, but, we couldn’t help it …then … we couldn’t help but to keep listening …

On the left side of the bar, a man, originally from North Carolina (as we came to know), was sitting. He was having a conversation with a man on the right side of the bar, who, as we listened, was a “local.” They were having a discussion … over beers … about the Bible …

Carol and I were speechless … just stared at each other … knowing that we were witnessing, in person, one of the most special, personal, and most improbable conversations we’d ever be privy to. They were actually having a discussion, between beers …

They were discussing many of the “finer points” of the book of Genesis, and, I’m not making this up … it was almost chapter-by-chapter … until they got to the part about … Sodom and Gomorrah … I’m not making this up … when they got to the part about Sodom and Gomorrah … it was decided, by both parties … that “we can’t go there” … that’s an actual quote … and the discussion ended.

As I wrote earlier, “Have things changed? Think about it.”

Yet, here we were, witnessing “history,” to us. It was an incredible moment. Once Carol and I realized what was happening at the bar, we sat mesmerized … listening to every sentence, every pint … I mean point …

There are two distinct parts of the conversation I remember. The man to our left, from North Carolina, stated that he was raised a Southern Baptist. This is as direct a quote as I remember:
Yeah, I was raised a Baptist. Then, I married a Catholic girl.”
He went on to describe, in detail, how he had gone to a sort of “weekend” with his betrothed, to a church-sponsored event.
The response from the other side of the bar:
“Yeah, I did that once.”

This man from the Carolinas also spoke at length about a tradition his home town had which involved firing black powder muskets. As a fan of black powder shooting (having experience in the art), I listened intently to this, as well. He told of how, in his hometown, on the 4th of July, they fired muskets for 24 hours straight … yes, 24 hours straight …

So, that’s how “Cling Peaches” and a Bar “Harboring” a Bible study come together …

Edith’s Accident.
Cling Peaches.
Father Majeski.
45 Years Ago.

45 years ago?
We’ll never forget how these two events came together, for us, 45 years later.
I was able to find the video of the “Cling Peaches” part of the episode.
What a great cast!
What talent!
What memories … 45 years ago, and, just 2 months ago: