Category Archives: HISTORY CHANNELS

Stories, biographies, etc., including videos, covering topics and personalities from history.

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Quote: John Climie-Of John Harper and our Heritage

I Remember: When “The Lord’s Prayer” Was a Hit Record

Hi Friends:

Recently, I was listening to an old broadcast of “American Top 40” with Casey Kasem (remember that?), and he was counting down the top hits of 1974. Yes, 1974. When I found the station, Casey was the mid-80’s section of the countdown … and there it was …

Coming in at number 86 on the year-long countdown was … “The Lord’s Prayer.”
Yes … “that” Lord’s Prayer, put to music and recorded by Sister Janet Mead.

Hold on … That’s not all:
The song reached # 3 on the Australian Charts, and … The song became an international hit record …
Yes …an international hit record.
Hold on … That’s not all:
It sold three million copies worldwide, reaching at the top of the “pop charts” in nations like Canada, Japan, Brazil, Germany, and the United States.

Yes … “that” United States.

The song entered Billboard’s Top 100 charts on February 24, 1974, was on the charts for 13 weeks, and reached # 4 on the charts in April, 1974, during “Holy Week,” the week before Easter Sunday. The record also reached # 2 on the Adult Contemporary singles chart. “The Lord’s Prayer” was a certified “Gold Record” in the United States, meaning sales of over One Million copies. The single earned her a Grammy Award nomination.
 
The single was the very first Australian recording to sell over one million copies in the United States.

Plus … this:
It also became the only song to hit the Top 10 in which the entire lyrical content originated from the words of the Bible. More specifically, it is the only Top 10 hit whose lyrics were attributed to Jesus Christ.

Janet Meade was (and is) an Australian Catholic nun. She taught music at Saint Aloysius College where the original music video for “The Lord’s Prayer” was filmed. She was born in Adelaide, South Australia. When she was 17, she formed a rock band to provide music for the weekly Mass at her local church. She studied piano at the Adelaide Conservatorium before joining the Sisters of Mercy order and became a music teacher at local Catholic schools.

Mead began making professional recordings of her music for schools and churches in 1973. Later in 1973, she traveled to Sydney for a recording session with Festival Records, produced by Martin Erdman. Originally wanted as a “B” side, “The Lord’s Prayer” became an international hit record. Mead donated her share of the royalties to charity.

In 2004, Mead received the Yamaha Golden Gospel Award in recognition of her services to Australian Christian music.

I just checked “Billboard’s Top 100” for the week of April 13, 1974, and “The Lord’s Prayer” is listed as # 4.

I know you are curious, so here goes:
At # 3 on the charts, “TSOP (The Sound Of Philadelphia)” by MFSB Featuring The Three Degrees
# 2: “Hooked On A Feeling” by Blue Swede
# 1: “Bennie And The Jets” by Elton John

As I look at the charts for that week, I see … “moving up 7 notches this week, up to # 20 on the charts is … ‘Tubular Bells’ by Mike Oldfield … the theme for the movie “The Exorcist.”

It would be so easy to do a “then vs. now” commentary, but, I don’t think I need to.

We decided to share this particular video of the song, as it has a lot of photos of Janet Meade, and some of the record labels which released the singles.

Usually, we add the words to the song we are featuring.
Don’t think we have to, on this one.

Please enjoy Sister Janet Meade and her hit recording of
“The Lord’s Prayer.”

Still “Standing:” On Professional Athletes, T-Shirts, World Wars, And The Flag

Hi Friends:

This may be the hardest time I’ve ever had with writing about a particular subject.

I’ve gone back and forth with this one, thinking, praying … just wanting to do the right thing.

The whole, entire purpose of my writing, and our efforts on social media, is “to bless, inspire, and encourage.” I pray every day that we’ll be able to “bless, inspire, and encourage.”

I make every effort to not be a “news commentary” or even to comment at all on “what is happening” in our country. I see, like you, “what is happening.” There are already so many “channels” out there that supply commentary, and, yes, so much of it is negative.
There is so much good in our country, the United States of America. There is also much good in other countries. Unfortunately, so often, when we feel compelled to write about “what’s going on” we are thinking of something negative, not positive.

So … when I witnessed the WNBA season opener, and saw the players-all the players-from both teams-walk off the floor, go back to the locker room, before the National Anthem played … I can’t put into words how I felt. I wasn’t expecting that … it caught me completely off guard.

I wasn’t mad … I wasn’t angry … I was ashamed.

So, this is the hard part of all this. I so look forward to the WNBA season. First, it means Summer is finally here. Second, we are so familiar with the players, having watched so many of them … followed their careers in college … still love the women’s college basketball … In fact, I am wearing a college women’s basketball T-Shirt as I write this … So, when I saw both teams go to the locker room, so they wouldn’t have to be “subjected” to the National Anthem … well … I just felt sick inside. Real sick. In watching another WNBA game this “opening” weekend, I saw an entire WNBA team kneel, arms locked in unison, while the National Anthem played.

I have written much about my feelings toward the NFL (No Flag Loyalty) for refusing to even air the National Anthem (except maybe on Thanksgiving and Super Bowl) during an NFL (No Flag Loyalty) regular season game. Well … guess what? The WNBA hasn’t aired our National Anthem so far … and, it’s not looking any better for tomorrow.

I still, and I mean I still, don’t understand why an American citizen would not stand for our National Anthem, or would leave the field before the Anthem is played. That’s pretty much it. I just don’t understand why. And then, I don’t understand why, and I mean I still, don’t understand why someone who is an American would support someone who would not stand for our National Anthem, or support someone who would leave the field before the Anthem is played.

I never thought I would ever see the day when this would even be an issue.
Last I heard … a particular individual who gained fame for kneeling during the Anthem would, one day, be considered a hero. I hope I never see that day. But, I never thought I’d see this day, either.  

By the way, the play-by-play announcer, whom I do have much respect and admiration for, would, later, go out of his way to clarify: The WNBA teams left the floor before our National Anthem was played-and not during/or when our National Anthem was playing. He, however … did not explain what the difference between the two actions are. Meant the same to me.

I really was having trouble with this one. Should I write about this? The definition of a blog is “a website that contains online personal reflections, comments … provided by the writer.” I’ve tried not to do this, for reasons explained. However … if I wrote so much about the NFL (No Flag Loyalty) … should I … could I … ignore this? I really wanted to.  

I struggled with whether I should or shouldn’t.
Then … I noticed the T-Shirt I was wearing:

It features the soldiers raising the American Flag on Iwo Jima. I’m sure you are familiar with that image. Above the American Flag, in the sky overhead, fireworks are in dazzling display. On the bottom-right of the image, is written “FREEDOM 2001.” Yes, that’s how long I’ve worn this T-Shirt.

The American Flag. How many brave men and women have died or been injured defending it?

Yeah … I’ll stand.

I thought about this: What if we had not won the war? In this case, World War II?
What if another country won?
I guess I was thinking what if our enemy (enemies) in that war had won?
Would our highly-paid, highly-coddled athletes still refuse to stand? Would an entire team be allowed to just walk off the field of play so they would not have to be “subjected” to this Nation’s Anthem?

What would happen today, right now … in so many other countries, if an individual or entire team refused to stand for their nation’s National Anthem?

As you know, during World War II, and other wars before and since … including today … it was and is the direct actions of brave men and women willing to sacrifice their lives to make, and then, to keep, us free.

I believe I know what the rest of the world (especially our “enemies”) think of this situation where people, claiming to be American citizens, refuse to honor our Flag, and our country.

Remember, the Public Address Announcer, at the stadium/arena very clearly states:
“And now, to honor America, please stand …”

To honor America.
So … that is the purpose of singing/playing our National Anthem before the game … I see …

So, this would mean, if you don’t stand to honor America …

While I stared at my T-Shirt … I wondered … I really, really did:

What do our brave men and women, around the world (including here at “home”) think about someone claiming to be an American, who will not stand or honor our Flag, or our National Anthem? I really did think about this.

So, I made the decision that the right thing to do was to voice my concern over this issue.
As an American, an American citizen, founder of a company which has “Freedom” in its name, and as an American writer, I felt I had no choice.

Yeah … I’ll stand.

And, continue to wonder: If they won’t stand for our flag, whose flag would they stand for?

I have to stand. I understand the sacrifices which were made to gain our freedom, and I understand what the American Flag represents.

My Father, and my Father-in-Law, both had American Flags draped over their caskets. I saw and heard the 21-gun salutes. Heard the bugler and “Taps.”
The last funeral of a non-family member I attended was a close friend. He, too, had the American Flag draped over his casket. I heard the bugler and “Taps.”

I support the brave men and women of the Armed Forces, and their mission and work around the globe.

Yeah … I’ll stand.

I just don’t understand why someone won’t stand to honor these men and women, and our country, our Flag.
I do understand that they have a right not to stand, I guess. But, don’t they realize the reason they have that right … the reason they have that freedom … is because of the very country they live in? That this country, the United States, allows them the freedom to live whatever lifestyle they choose … and, to share that lifestyle with whomever they choose?

Why didn’t I just turn off the TV … I couldn’t … I had to watch Sabrina Ionescu’s (followed her in college) debut game … And … and … if I had turned it off, I would not have seen this:
One of my favorite former college players, which we followed her entire career, sustained an ankle injury, and was down on the court … Before the network could cut away … I witnessed my very favorite WNBA player … kneeling next to the injured player … and, she had laid her hands on her, and was praying … yes … praying … This was similar to NFL (No Flag Loyalty) games where, after the game, there are a number of players-from both sides-who gather in a circle and pray … Yep, as soon as the cameras see this, they quickly, quickly pan away, but I’ve seen it several times after a game …

I’m writing this between WNBA games. Yes … I am still watching … but I won’t tomorrow night, and I’m thinking about future games. I keep getting calls from our closest WNBA team, trying to get me to buy season tickets. I think, now, that I will return his call, so that he will know that, as long as his team does not “honor America,” don’t call back.

If more fans took this stance: We won’t support a team which doesn’t support America … you can bet that … all of a sudden … if it was costing them money … these sports would become the most Patriotic organizations on earth …
Once again, I’ll say this: While I no longer watch Major League Baseball, last time I watched they not only sang our National Anthem, but they played “God Bless America” during the “7th-Inning stretch.” Can you imagine the uproar if the WNBA and NFL (No Flag Loyalty) wanted to sing “God Bless America” during a break in the game???

Can’t watch baseball anymore. Seems like there is not much of a penalty for cheating … even during the World Series, which, like a lot of things in this country, used to be revered …
So … should we change their name to MBL to stand for:
Mighty Big Lenses
Might Be Lying

No more baseball for me. Already cut the season. Before you know it … they’ll try to cut the number of innings they have to play …

I’m in-between games, and I’m writing. As it gets close to the second televised WNBA game, I am switching between channels (ESPN, NESN, CBSSN) to see who is carrying the “late game.” I’m not making this up: ESPN was at the end of a MSL (that’s soccer) game, and they showed highlights of the game … the teams playing were from American cities (I don’t know much about MLS), and the highlights showed an entire team kneeling during our National Anthem. I don’t know … If they don’t stand for our flag, whose flag do they stand for? I’m sure a lot of people around the world watch soccer from ‘the states … I wonder how they felt about that … Anyway … they say “MLS is back,” but for me, if this is what they “stand for” (did I just write that?), they can stay gone …

I switched to NESN … that’s New England Sports Network … the show playing was “The Best of the 2019-2020 Bruins Season” … I’m not making this up … I only watched one highlight from last season … it was Lauren Hart singing our National Anthem before a Boston Bruins/Philadelphia Flyers hockey game … I’m serious … this was a highlight of the entire season … Not only did I stand, but I made a mental note to start watching the Bruins on TV …

Then … on ESPN … you know how they scroll the headlines at the bottom of the screen?
On the NBA turn, in bold letters, it proclaimed that all coaches and players had kneeled during our National Anthem before the game … Not sure if they played the anthem live or not … that would have been honoring America … I don’t know what the score was; that didn’t seem to be as important a story …

So, in closing, I still don’t understand:
How could an American not stand for our National Anthem?
I mean … how could they not?

Whose flag would they stand for?

Do we need to change the names of the leagues to:

WNBA: We Need to Be American
WNBA: Need to Be American

MLS: Don’t care. Maybe
Might Leave Shortly.

As I’ve written, I’m not angry at all this. I know we live in a world that is lost and dying.
I know that the problem with such issues is not intelligence, but blindness.

As an American, who proudly supports our military and soldiers (past and present), I believe it is the right thing to do, to “stand and honor America.”

Next thing you know, they will try to dis-honor our police.

For our friends around the world, let me advise that, when referring to “American sports athletes,” I am writing of individuals who play for an American city or American region team, located within the United States borders. If I told you how much money they make, for playing a game, while enjoying the freedoms of living within the United States, you probably would not believe me, and especially would not believe that they would refuse the opportunity to “stand and honor” the country which allows them to have such freedom, posterity, and privilege. I know, as we support the efforts of those in “hostile and restricted” nations, that, so many of you would be tempted to say, “Why don’t you come and live over here for awhile?”

So … If you to ask me if, instead of “standing to honor our brave men and women who are proudly serving our country both here and around the world,” would I prefer to kneel …

No thanks.
I am an American.
I’ll stand.
I have to.
I’m an American.

Richard. Vincent. Rose.    

I Remember: Perhaps a Review of More Than The Movie: “Richard Jewell”

Hi Friends:

The 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia, was perhaps the most anticipated, and most publicized event in the state’s history. I was living less than 50 miles away, and the publicity surrounding the event began many, many months before, during the “selection process” leading up to the big “It’s Atlanta!” announcement. I still have my “1996 Olympics” sweatshirt.

Those Olympics started on July 19th, with the unforgettable moment when Muhammad Ali lit the cauldron. Days later, it would be another man, Richard Jewell, who would be in for the fight of his life. On July 27th, mid-way through the Games, a bomb exploded in Centennial Olympic Park, killing one woman, and injuring 111 people. Only minutes before the explosion, Richard Jewell, working as a security guard, had spotted the abandoned green knapsack that contained the bomb, and had called it to the attention of the police, before attempting to move visitors away. He would be praised for his actions, which saved many lives.

However … you know the story … within 3 days … word “leaked out” that it was, in fact, Richard Jewell who had been named as the suspect … the bomber …

What followed is what Mr. Jewell called, in interviews later, “88 days of hell.” He would also compare the media’s constant hounding of him to a frenzy of piranhas.

I remember Richard Jewell, and “all this” from the Atlanta Olympics. I know “the games” were going on, but it seemed like “all the talk” was about Richard Jewell … and, how guilty he was.
Heck … I remember thinking he was guilty. Why wouldn’t I? After all, we could trust the media.
It was all you heard about … the biggest news … not only about Richard Jewell, but “why he did it.” I mean … the newspapers called him guilty, he was the only FBI suspect, so the government called him guilty … you can trust both of those, can’t you??? So, I remember there being “no doubt” they had gotten their man.

The movie: Great.
Carol and I left the theater with tears. Now, a few days later, Carol just said, “I felt so bad for him.” There some funny moments, too. Directed by Clint Eastwood, this isn’t the first movie by Clint Eastwood, based upon true events, which show what a genius film-maker he is. The movie is Rated R, for good reason. Bad language.
Perhaps most remarkable is the performance of Paul Walter Hauser as Richard Jewell:
Remarkable.
And … Cathy Bates plays his mother!
Sam Rockwell plays Richard’s lawyer, Watson Bryant.
Jon Hamm delivers a powerful-believable performance as FBI agent Tom Shaw, and Olivia Wilde stars as AJC reporter Kathy Scruggs.

From what I have been reading, there are only a couple of things put in the movie which were added, but not very much.

It was very, very difficult to watch this movie, and what was happening “right in front of my eyes” on the screen without thinking about what is happening “right in front of our eyes” today. It was just difficult not to see the resemblance between some things which were happening then, and what is happening now.

I’m referring to the “media frenzy” and “government” part. While I feel like I need to be careful about what I write, I must also write how I felt. I saw, played out on the screen, a true story of what happens when the media, and the government combine against a “common foe.”

There were some really great lines in this movie, as you would guess. I’ll just mention two lines which really resonated with me, as I sat there, trying to “enjoy” the movie (which I did, immensely), and not “look around” at the events happening now.

Richard Jewell was innocent, and, because he was innocent, he didn’t realize just how much trouble he was in. He didn’t do it, and he knew he didn’t do it. His attorney knew this, too. However, in an effort to try to get his client to understand how serious this was, his attorney (Watson Bryant) told him to think about this:

“You are facing the two most powerful forces on earth.
The government and the media.”

Another statement was made by Watson Bryant’s girlfriend (who later became his wife), Nadya Light (played by Nina Arianda). In the movie, it is obvious she is from a foreign country. She made this statement, which I couldn’t shake:
“In my country, when the government says you are guilty, it means you are innocent.”

Mr. Jewell made a statement toward the end of the movie. His concern was that now, because of what happened to him, if someone else was in the exact, same situation as he was in at Centennial Park, that he was afraid that person would be afraid to act, because of what had happened to him.

I have the same kind of concern about someone trying to make the decision to run for public/political office today. I’m afraid that because of “the way it is out there,” people who are genuinely qualified for the job, and would do a great job, won’t want to do it, because of the “way it is.”

I know there may be a lot of people who may not like this movie, like, perhaps, the government, and, perhaps the media … but, that in itself makes its own statement.

Do I recommend this movie?
Yes … because it reminds us all, not just of what happened … but, what could happen.

Here’s a trailer from the movie “Richard Jewell,” which also features Clint Eastwood:

From the 1940’s: “How to Behave and Why?”/Add-On to “Be a Good Memory”

Hi Friends:

Recently, we featured the quote about “Be a Good Memory, which led to the most recent post about “The Kind of Parent I Don’t Want to Be.”

Now, from the same folder which contained the “Be a Good Memory Quote,” I discovered this book review, from a book written way back in the 1940’s, by author Munro Leaf, which continues that same theme about “Are most of the people I know glad that I am here?”

Part of me feels that this should reside in the “I Remember” category, and it is unfortunate that I feel that way. However … “I Remember” when books like this were “must reading.” It was popular because … and, yes, I’m going to write this … It was popular because there was a time when a book like this reinforced what we already were taught at home. We understood the book because “that’s just what Mom and Dad have been telling us all along …”

I find it remarkable, reading this book review now, that the book seems to be aimed at parents as much as their children. That … are you ready for this in 2019? … As important as it is for children to “act right,” it is just as important for parents to “act right.” Imagine that? Parents are expected … or, should that be parents “were” expected to act right? The author of this book, Munro Leaf, seems to pinpoint the importance of parent’s behavior … perhaps suggesting that the behavior of parents could influence the behavior of their children?

See how this all ties in?

I discovered this review for the book “How to Behave and Why” in the folder from years ago, and it could be several reviews I had combined. To give proper credit, I’ve included the link to the book on Amazon. Here is how the book is described:

“’How to Behave and Why’ is a timeless classic published in 1946 by Munro Leaf, well-known author of another timeless classic, Ferdinand. Leaf suggests, “The two biggest questions to ask ourselves in life, at any age, are: “Are most of the people I know glad that I am here? Am I glad that I am here, myself?” Because after all, getting along with and being loved and trusted by others is key to happiness and success in life.
“How to Behave and Why” explains to kids that to make good friends and keep them you have to be honest, fair, strong, and wise, “and all that isn’t so easy.”
He reminds kids that learning to live a happy life is a lot like sailing in a boat with other people. You have to learn the ropes before you can command the ship “and help to make the world a better place for all of us.”
First published in 1946, Munro Leaf’s “How To Behave And Why” gives touchingly sincere yet gently funny lessons in Honesty, Fairness, Strength, and Wisdom. Originally intended for the very young, but with meaning for us all, “How To Behave and Why” is a true classic, charmingly illustrated with childlike drawings, and with a timeless message. It is a sure guide for teaching children (and adults) how to behave.”

To check out the link to the book, I looked at current reviews (from today, 2019):

In her Amazon book review, Karin Snelson wrote, “A satisfying reflection of a time when what was right and wrong seemed more black and white. (All ages).”

By the way … in looking at comments about the book, not all were favorable. At least one person did not like the use of the word “stupid” in the book.

I don’t know about you, but … I sure have done some “stupid” things in my life.
Including my adult life.
Maybe … I’ve done more “stupid” things in my adult life than in my childhood … I don’t know …
I just know I’ve done “stupid” things in both.

Here’s the link to the book on Amazon:

How to Behave and Why?

What was Cooking in 1978: “Recipe For Happiness in the Home”

Hi Friends:

I was looking through some old cookbooks, and found this in the opening pages of a cookbook that was put together for the Bi-Centennial Celebration (1778-1978) for the Town of Effingham, New Hampshire.
That was 41 years ago.
There is no author listed.

The cookbook was put together by the Effingham Bi-Centennial Committee, and the introduction was written by Ollie Keller, Chairman of the Committee.

Once again, you just never know where you’ll find inspiration … just always “be on the lookout.”

Enjoy this “Recipe” from 1978:

Recipe For Happiness in the Home

Take one Christian man
Add one Christian woman
Use a marriage ceremony performed
by a minister of God
Stir gently with love
Add children as provided by God
Blend thoroughly with more love
and understanding in an atmosphere
of Christian fellowship
and devotion to God’s word.
To this mixture add a combination
of patience, humor, discipline
and self-sacrifice.
Sprinkle with just enough troubles
and cares to hold all
ingredients tightly together,
Add prayer continually
Allow to grow and brown slowly but
Thoroughly in the sunshine of
God’s grace and blessings.

Quote: What’s in Your “Pack?”

I never know where I’ll find inspiration, but I’m always “on the lookout.”

Recently, I was reading the November 1997 issue of “Northern New Hampshire Magazine,” the print edition, a monthly newspaper (long out of print) which offered mostly historical articles relative to “The North Country.” This particular issue featured “An interview with Screen Legend Fay Wray,” who used to visit Northern New Hampshire each year.

Also featured in the November 1997 issue were 3 book reviews, done by Cynthia Jordan.

One of the books reviewed was “Why I’ll Never Hike The Appalachian Trail … More Writings From A White Mountain Tramper,” written by Littleton, New Hampshire’s Mike Dickerman.

The book shares the author’s opinions on topics such as the use of cell phones “on the trail.” 

Keep in mind this was 1997, and, technically, the “cell phone” of that time was actually called a “mobile phone.” This was before texting, and, really, even before mobile phones could, as a standard feature, access the internet … and certainly, before “Smartphones” were in every hand or pocket.

Sounds like an “I’m not that old, but I remember …” entry.

Think about how mobile telephones have changed in such a short time.

Now, they seem to be almost a matter of life-or-death, a necessity. I have heard teenagers make statements like “I can’t live without my cellphone,” or “My cellphone is my life.” I know that may sound crazy to you … but just ask their parents … if you can get their parents off their cellphones long enough to attempt conversation.

Yes, I just wrote that.

‘Ya know … I’m not that old … but I remember … when there were no cell phones.

Anyway … back in 1997 … it was a serious debate on whether mobile/cellular phones were useful/should be taken on “the trail.”

In the review of “Why I’ll Never Hike The Appalachian Trail,” Cynthia Jordan adds that, in the book, Mike Dickerman comments that ‘cellular phones, while useful as tools, have no place in the backcountry because they can’t replace self-reliance.’

Then, she adds this quote from the book:

“What you carry in your pack is important, but what you carry in your head is even more important.”

He would add that we should rely less on technology … and, rely more on education.

The book is still available on Amazon.

To give proper credit, here’s a link to the book:
Why I’ll Never Hike The Appalachian Trail

I think I’ll add that quote again, from, yes, 22 years ago:

“What you carry in your pack is important, but what you carry in your head is even more important.”

June 29: “Day of the Christian Martyr” and the Groenewald Family

Saturday, June 29, 2019 has been designated as “Day of the Christian Martyr,” to honor the legacy of those who have sacrificed their lives for the advancement of the Gospel. June 29th is believed by church historians to be the day that the Apostle Paul was executed, on the Appian Way, in Rome. This year, Christians around the world will take time on Saturday and throughout the weekend to honor believers, like Paul, who sacrificed their lives for the gospel message and the advancement of Christ’s Kingdom.

This year, Werner, Rodé and Jean-Pierre Groenewald’s names will be inscribed onto the Martyrs Memorial in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, at the worldwide headquarters of “Voice of the Martyrs.”
In 2014, Werner, Jean-Pierre and Rodé Groenewald were killed when Taliban fighters attacked their home.

In 2003, Werner and his wife, Hannelie Groenewald, left their comfortable life in South Africa, when God called them to Afghanistan. Along with their two children, Rodé and Jean-Pierre, they served the Afghan people; Hannelie as a doctor, and Werner in discipleship and leadership development.

It wasn’t a popular decision. Some in their own families argued that God would never call them to take their children to such a war-torn and dangerous place. But, they accepted God’s calling. In addition to being a wife and mother, Hannelie became known as a teacher, doctor, and cook in a country not known for welcoming foreigners-especially women.

It was November 29, 2014: At about 3:30 in the afternoon, three Islamists broke into their apartment and shot to death Werner, Jean-Pierre and Rodé. After a two-hour standoff with police, one of the attackers detonated a bomb inside the building, killing himself and others, while the other two attackers were killed in an ensuing skirmish.

Hannelie’s life was spared because she wasn’t there: She had been called to the site of a U.N. meeting to provide medical care in case of an attack … which was anticipated … but, no one knew where the attack would take place …

We’d like to share these links with you, in addition to Hannelie’s own testimony via this video from Voice of the Martyrs:

First, here’s a link where you can read the full story of the Groenewalds.
In addition, you can view this video, and, also, there will be a link to enable you to hear the MARTYRS MEMORIAL INDUCTION CEREMONY, beginning at 9 a.m. CDT on Saturday, via Facebook Live, or you will be able to hear the recording of the ceremony beginning at 10 a.m.
Here’s the link:
MARTYRS MEMORIAL INDUCTION CEREMONY

Another link I’d like to share:
This is a direct link to VOM Radio (Voice of the Martyrs weekly radio program), where you can hear Hannelie Groenewald sharing the heartbreak of losing her family, and her testimony of the goodness of God to sustain her through her grief:
VOM Radio

Now, we share the video. We are honored to support the efforts of Voice of the Martyrs:

Why Not Me? Samuel F.B. Morse Quote Explains

Hi Friends:

When I was in School, one of the first inventions we learned about was the telegraph, and its inventor, Samuel F.B. Morse.

Recently, I read this quote from Samuel F. B. Morse, and his explanation of why he “just happened” to be the one who came up with the invention … His response resonated deep within my soul. We share this with anyone to whom God has given a vision, or a task, which seems too great for them to handle … A vision, a dream, which, when shared with others, may get a response like, “Why would God pick you to do this?” I think, also, that the person to whom God gives such a vision or dream to, may have the same response, deep within themselves: “Why would God give this to me?”

I hope this resonates within your soul, as well.

I think it was a football team, a couple of years ago, which had the motto of  “Why not us?”

The answer may be clearer than we want to think:
Why not us?

Samuel F.B. Morse once said that when he was confronted with problems, when he couldn’t think of an answer, “…whenever I could not see my way clearly, I knelt down and prayed to God for light and understanding.”

On May 24, 1844, Morse sent the historic first telegraphed message, “What hath God wrought!” from Washington, D.C. to Baltimore.

Here’s what Samuel F.B. Morse said, when asked why he was “selected” to bring the life-changing invention of the telegraph to the world:

“I have made a valuable application of electricity not because I was superior to other men but solely because God, who meant it for mankind, must reveal it to someone and He was pleased to reveal it to me.”

This one goes on the wall!

Blessings,
R.V.R.

Eres Tu-Part One: The Guitars of Sonny James

Hi Friends:

Growing up in North Georgia, my older sister would listen to a country music station, WDOD, out of Chattanooga, Tennessee. The announcer who did the mid-day shift was Jerry Rivers. If you remember the station’s ID jingle … “WDOD … On the banks of the Tennessee …” At the end of his daily shift, he would play this song, as he would voice-over his “thank yous” and “goodbyes.”

I never forgot this beautiful, haunting instrumental, with the background chorus. So, years later, I used this same instrumental to voice-over my own signoff. It was perfect to speak over, it was instantly recognizable, and it had a great “cold” ending.

The song “Eres Tu (Touch the Wind)” was originally a hit for the Spanish vocal group Mocedades in 1974, and was recorded in 1975 as part an easy listening guitar instrumental album by country music legend Sonny James, entitled “The Guitars of Sonny James.”

A few words about the great Sonny James (May 1, 1928 – February 22, 2016):
As singer, song-writer, and musician, Sonny James’ biggest hit was “Young Love,” which made it to the top of both country and pop music charts in January to February 1957. He was known as “the Southern Gentleman, and he had 72 country and pop-charted records from 1953 to 1983, including a 5-year streak of 16 straight Billboard #1 singles among his total of 26 #1 hits. Twenty-one of his albums reached the country top ten from 1964 to 1976. In 1957, Sonny James became the first country music recording artist to appear on “The Ed Sullivan Show.”

Sonny James was given a star on the “Hollywood Walk of Fame” in 1961. In 1967, he co-hosted the first Country Music Association Awards Show (with Bobbi Gentry), and was himself inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2007.

In February 1971, James was the first country music artist whose music went into space; he made a special music recording for the crew of Apollo 14. They later presented him with one of the small American flags that they had carried to the Moon.

On the “Guitars of Sonny James” album, notice that track B4 is “Paper Roses.” In 1973, Sonny James helped launch the solo career of Marie Osmond, by producing and arranging her first three albums, including her smash hit, “Paper Roses.”

This was the best recording I could find to share.
Enjoy “The Guitars of Sonny James” with “Eres Tu:”