Category Archives: I REMEMBER

Looking back at things I remember from what seems like “not so long ago.”

Eres Tu-Part Two: Winning Song for “Mocedades” in 1973

Hi Friends:

In Part One, we featured my favorite instrumental performance, “Eres Tu” by “The Guitars of Sonny James.” Here’s a link to that:

“Eres Tu” The Guitars of Sonny James.

So … Can a song, in which I don’t understand the words … become my favorite video?
Well … I searched and searched for a vocal performance of “Eres Tu” to feature in this short series …
I watched and listened to videos made all over the world … and, to me, this one is my favorite.

A brief history:
A Spanish singing group from the Basque Country, Mocedades represented Spain in the Eurovision Song Contest in 1973 with this song. Amaya Uranga, the Lead Singer in this video (born February 18, 1947 in Bilbao, Spain), spent 15 years with the group. She formed the group in the late 1960’s with eight members, which included her sister Izaskun, and her brother Roberto. After their success in this contest, the band launched a hugely successful music career in Spain and Latin America, and would go through several membership changes in the next years, becoming popular all around the world.

I just love this video!
Yes … even though I don’t know all the words, I have played this version of the song so many times that I can sing parts of it “by heart.”

All I know is that, for me, this incorporates all of the elements of a great song on video. As an old-time “radio man” I respect and admire a great performance. For me, this one delivers. To me, as an “Old-School” guy, I love the way they alternate between studio and live/stage performance.
Yes … when you watch this video, there is no doubt it comes from “back in the day.”
Yet, for me, “good is good,” regardless of time or place.
It has “back in the day” written all over it, and, for me, that seems to make me enjoy it all the more.

It’s like my favorite instrumental “came to life” and became my favorite music video.
I love the way they did this, showing clips of all of the singers, back and forth between “live” and studio … not missing a beat.
It reminds me of performing in front of very young children: They don’t get the jokes … they just know I am joking … and they love that.

So, I don’t understand the words, but it is such a great performance, I love it.

Enjoy Mocedades and “Eres Tu:”

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From the 1940’s: “How to Behave and Why?”/Add-On to “Be a Good Memory”

Hi Friends:

Recently, we featured the quote about “Be a Good Memory, which led to the most recent post about “The Kind of Parent I Don’t Want to Be.”

Now, from the same folder which contained the “Be a Good Memory Quote,” I discovered this book review, from a book written way back in the 1940’s, by author Munro Leaf, which continues that same theme about “Are most of the people I know glad that I am here?”

Part of me feels that this should reside in the “I Remember” category, and it is unfortunate that I feel that way. However … “I Remember” when books like this were “must reading.” It was popular because … and, yes, I’m going to write this … It was popular because there was a time when a book like this reinforced what we already were taught at home. We understood the book because “that’s just what Mom and Dad have been telling us all along …”

I find it remarkable, reading this book review now, that the book seems to be aimed at parents as much as their children. That … are you ready for this in 2019? … As important as it is for children to “act right,” it is just as important for parents to “act right.” Imagine that? Parents are expected … or, should that be parents “were” expected to act right? The author of this book, Munro Leaf, seems to pinpoint the importance of parent’s behavior … perhaps suggesting that the behavior of parents could influence the behavior of their children?

See how this all ties in?

I discovered this review for the book “How to Behave and Why” in the folder from years ago, and it could be several reviews I had combined. To give proper credit, I’ve included the link to the book on Amazon. Here is how the book is described:

“’How to Behave and Why’ is a timeless classic published in 1946 by Munro Leaf, well-known author of another timeless classic, Ferdinand. Leaf suggests, “The two biggest questions to ask ourselves in life, at any age, are: “Are most of the people I know glad that I am here? Am I glad that I am here, myself?” Because after all, getting along with and being loved and trusted by others is key to happiness and success in life.
“How to Behave and Why” explains to kids that to make good friends and keep them you have to be honest, fair, strong, and wise, “and all that isn’t so easy.”
He reminds kids that learning to live a happy life is a lot like sailing in a boat with other people. You have to learn the ropes before you can command the ship “and help to make the world a better place for all of us.”
First published in 1946, Munro Leaf’s “How To Behave And Why” gives touchingly sincere yet gently funny lessons in Honesty, Fairness, Strength, and Wisdom. Originally intended for the very young, but with meaning for us all, “How To Behave and Why” is a true classic, charmingly illustrated with childlike drawings, and with a timeless message. It is a sure guide for teaching children (and adults) how to behave.”

To check out the link to the book, I looked at current reviews (from today, 2019):

In her Amazon book review, Karin Snelson wrote, “A satisfying reflection of a time when what was right and wrong seemed more black and white. (All ages).”

By the way … in looking at comments about the book, not all were favorable. At least one person did not like the use of the word “stupid” in the book.

I don’t know about you, but … I sure have done some “stupid” things in my life.
Including my adult life.
Maybe … I’ve done more “stupid” things in my adult life than in my childhood … I don’t know …
I just know I’ve done “stupid” things in both.

Here’s the link to the book on Amazon:

How to Behave and Why?

Quote: What’s in Your “Pack?”

I never know where I’ll find inspiration, but I’m always “on the lookout.”

Recently, I was reading the November 1997 issue of “Northern New Hampshire Magazine,” the print edition, a monthly newspaper (long out of print) which offered mostly historical articles relative to “The North Country.” This particular issue featured “An interview with Screen Legend Fay Wray,” who used to visit Northern New Hampshire each year.

Also featured in the November 1997 issue were 3 book reviews, done by Cynthia Jordan.

One of the books reviewed was “Why I’ll Never Hike The Appalachian Trail … More Writings From A White Mountain Tramper,” written by Littleton, New Hampshire’s Mike Dickerman.

The book shares the author’s opinions on topics such as the use of cell phones “on the trail.” 

Keep in mind this was 1997, and, technically, the “cell phone” of that time was actually called a “mobile phone.” This was before texting, and, really, even before mobile phones could, as a standard feature, access the internet … and certainly, before “Smartphones” were in every hand or pocket.

Sounds like an “I’m not that old, but I remember …” entry.

Think about how mobile telephones have changed in such a short time.

Now, they seem to be almost a matter of life-or-death, a necessity. I have heard teenagers make statements like “I can’t live without my cellphone,” or “My cellphone is my life.” I know that may sound crazy to you … but just ask their parents … if you can get their parents off their cellphones long enough to attempt conversation.

Yes, I just wrote that.

‘Ya know … I’m not that old … but I remember … when there were no cell phones.

Anyway … back in 1997 … it was a serious debate on whether mobile/cellular phones were useful/should be taken on “the trail.”

In the review of “Why I’ll Never Hike The Appalachian Trail,” Cynthia Jordan adds that, in the book, Mike Dickerman comments that ‘cellular phones, while useful as tools, have no place in the backcountry because they can’t replace self-reliance.’

Then, she adds this quote from the book:

“What you carry in your pack is important, but what you carry in your head is even more important.”

He would add that we should rely less on technology … and, rely more on education.

The book is still available on Amazon.

To give proper credit, here’s a link to the book:
Why I’ll Never Hike The Appalachian Trail

I think I’ll add that quote again, from, yes, 22 years ago:

“What you carry in your pack is important, but what you carry in your head is even more important.”

Mother’s Day: I Remember Jimmy Dean’s “IOU”

Hi Friends:

I’m not that old … but I remember … Jimmy Dean’s tribute to Moms, simply called “IOU.”

How long has it been since you’ve heard it?
Many of you may have never heard it, but, after you hear it, you’ll never forget it.

I remember … when this recording was brand new, and they played it on the radio as much as any hit record of the day … I remember Jimmy Dean … as a singer, actor … before he went into business making sausage … What strikes me is that, through the years, he was always the same “Jimmy Dean.” Whether it was on a TV show, or an interview, or those sausage commercials, he was always the same Jimmy Dean.

I remember how popular he was … I remember “Daniel Boone” and the James Bond movie he starred in … as I got older and went into radio, I remember his many hit records … and, this one.

How long has it been since you heard it?
I think we all have certain parts of “IOU” that we remember:
For me, it was the line about the jack knife in the boot … and … about the apple pie.
… That line about the apple pie …
And, of course, the way it ended.

The one line I specifically wrote down for this writing was this:
“She managed by simply doing without a whole lot of things that she needed herself.”

Before I share the recording, I’d just like to add, please, that we pray for all Mothers, and their families, for now, during this upcoming “Mother’s Day” period, and always.
Please remember that many Mothers, many Moms, many families, are going through a tremendous time of sadness today, as well as over the “Mother’s Day Weekend,” and in the time beyond.
I’m not speaking of just those of us who face the Mother’s Day holiday, like myself and my wife, whose Moms are no longer here. Yes, we know where they are, we will see them again, and we take comfort in that. We are so blessed to have been “raised right.”

I’d like to ask for special prayers for Mothers, around the globe, who have suffered great personal loss … and, they are facing “Mother’s Day” without their child, or children …
I am thinking of one particular Mother, one particular local family, who have just now, suffered the loss of their child … Someone I personally knew, a fine young man, from a fine family …
I just can’t imagine the pain they are going through, can’t imagine how difficult a time when, at a time anxiously awaited to celebrate family … they must concentrate on making other types of plans/arrangements … I just can’t image what they are going through …

This family … this Mom … is not alone … Please remember to pray for Moms who are going through unimaginable pain at this time … just after Spring has arrived …. Just after Easter …
just before Mother’s Day … I can’t imagine …

Thank you.

Now, we share:

IOU
Written by Dave Corcoran
Performed by Jimmy Dean

I am sharing this recording from the “Lost Nashville” Channel
Here’s a link to their channel: Lost Nashville

I love the “45” display (remember those?) and the photos with the words:

Eres Tu-Part One: The Guitars of Sonny James

Hi Friends:

Growing up in North Georgia, my older sister would listen to a country music station, WDOD, out of Chattanooga, Tennessee. The announcer who did the mid-day shift was Jerry Rivers. If you remember the station’s ID jingle … “WDOD … On the banks of the Tennessee …” At the end of his daily shift, he would play this song, as he would voice-over his “thank yous” and “goodbyes.”

I never forgot this beautiful, haunting instrumental, with the background chorus. So, years later, I used this same instrumental to voice-over my own signoff. It was perfect to speak over, it was instantly recognizable, and it had a great “cold” ending.

The song “Eres Tu (Touch the Wind)” was originally a hit for the Spanish vocal group Mocedades in 1974, and was recorded in 1975 as part an easy listening guitar instrumental album by country music legend Sonny James, entitled “The Guitars of Sonny James.”

A few words about the great Sonny James (May 1, 1928 – February 22, 2016):
As singer, song-writer, and musician, Sonny James’ biggest hit was “Young Love,” which made it to the top of both country and pop music charts in January to February 1957. He was known as “the Southern Gentleman, and he had 72 country and pop-charted records from 1953 to 1983, including a 5-year streak of 16 straight Billboard #1 singles among his total of 26 #1 hits. Twenty-one of his albums reached the country top ten from 1964 to 1976. In 1957, Sonny James became the first country music recording artist to appear on “The Ed Sullivan Show.”

Sonny James was given a star on the “Hollywood Walk of Fame” in 1961. In 1967, he co-hosted the first Country Music Association Awards Show (with Bobbi Gentry), and was himself inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2007.

In February 1971, James was the first country music artist whose music went into space; he made a special music recording for the crew of Apollo 14. They later presented him with one of the small American flags that they had carried to the Moon.

On the “Guitars of Sonny James” album, notice that track B4 is “Paper Roses.” In 1973, Sonny James helped launch the solo career of Marie Osmond, by producing and arranging her first three albums, including her smash hit, “Paper Roses.”

This was the best recording I could find to share.
Enjoy “The Guitars of Sonny James” with “Eres Tu:”

Wealth Stored for the Righteous-Part 20: “Going Postal!”

Hi Friends:

We get back to our continuing series “Wealth Stored for the Righteous,” thinking about things we are blessed with, right now, today, yet it seems, so often, we take for granted.

It strikes me that, so many of these things we take for granted, things which we have and are able to do or enjoy, are possible simply because of the place we are blessed to live in … the United States of America.

We’ve discussed things so basic to our everyday lives; things like being able to go to the grocery store and get pretty much anything we need, to just being able to travel, freely, “without incident.” We can get in our car and go anywhere we want … crossing state boundaries, without having to be searched, questioned, etc. Just this, which we take for granted, you just could not do, in so many countries around the world.

So, we look at another blessing we have, in this country, which we take for granted. Something so basic to our daily lives, that we just don’t even think about how blessed we are, we just take for granted:

Being able to mail a letter, anywhere in the United States, to any person or business, for the cost of a single postage stamp.
Boy … how many times have we heard the complaint about the price of postage. About how much it costs to mail a letter. I like to think we’ve all done it … complained about a price increase for the mail.

But … think about what a blessing it is to be able to just mail a letter … and have close to 100% certainty that it will arrive at its destination … unopened … in just a matter of days.

Think about that.
For the price of a postage stamp, your letter, your correspondence, regardless of who it is going to, or where … is guaranteed to be delivered, without being opened …
We just don’t realize the blessing that is.

Please note that there are exceptions to every rule. If you want to mail a letter to certain addresses, like (and, boy am I combining the two here), say the President, or a Prison, there are certain exceptions, but I am writing about just the “every day” letter, going to a “regular” address.

OK … I’m not that old … but, I remember when a postage stamp costs less than a dime. I can remember exactly what the price was, but even I can’t believe how much the price of postage has gone up … Uh Oh … Does that sound like a complaint???

Really … this is not an examination of the process or the cost. But, just being able to send a letter across the country for what we have to pay for a stamp is a pretty good deal.

So, I got to thinking about it.
How good a deal is it?
Here goes:

I need to mail a letter from New Hampshire to Los Angeles. That’s pretty much cross-country.
Let’s just say the address isn’t important, for this example.
I just need to get a letter to Los Angeles, from New Hampshire.

I could drive it there:
I did this search: “How far is it from Manchester, New Hampshire to Los Angeles, California?”
Answer:  3,026 miles

Another search: “The driving time from Manchester, New Hampshire to Los Angeles, California.”
Answer: 43 hours, 53 minutes

Let’s see … If I can drive 12 hours a day, that’s over 3 days.
If I get 25 miles to the gallon of gas … that’s 121 gallons of gas.
At 2.00 a gallon, that’s 242.00 in gas.
I’ll need to stay at a hotel. At 75.00 each night, that’s 225.00 for 3 nights.
I’ll need to eat along the way.
At, say, 60.00 a day for food, that’s 180.00 for the 3 days food.
So, just the basics … But, I need to get that letter there …
If I drive out to Los Angeles to deliver the letter, that’s 647.00.
And, that’s the basic expense. Just to get there.

By the way … I’ll need to get back to New Hampshire:
So … double the 647.00 …

It would take 6 days, and 1294.00 to get this letter to Los Angeles, get it delivered, and get back to New Hampshire. Really, it would be more like 7 days, as it is 43-44 hours each way.

1294.00 to get the letter there, and come back.

I know … I know … I think I’ll just fly the letter there.

Here goes:
New search: “Cheap flights from Manchester, New Hampshire to Los Angeles, California:”
First, all airlines showed between 8-9 hours flight time.
This is one way:
268.00
Hey!!! I can “save money if you fly from Boston!”

So, if I double that for the return trip, that’s 536.00 for the airline tickets.
It takes over 8 hours, so that’s 2 days, there and back.
You’d have to stay at a hotel at least once, at 75.00
Food for 2 days would be 120.00
I’d also have to drive to the airport in Manchester.
3 hours’ drive … one way.
136 miles.
I’d also have to leave my car at the airport for 3 days.
Plus … when I got to Los Angeles, I’d have to either rent a car, or take a taxi, to the letter’s destination, and then back to the airport.

Let’s see …

New search: “How long does it take to get a letter from Manchester, New Hampshire to Los Angeles, California?”
Answer:
I can get my letter there-guaranteed by the very next day for a little over 25.00
If I can wait, I can get it there in 2 days-guaranteed, for 7.35
And, hey … For that kind of money … you can track it, and get delivery confirmation!

Or … I can just mail it for 55 cents.
55 cents.

55 cents.
That’s 55 pennies.

That’s a deal.

And, this isn’t to even mention the security of our mail system. You can pretty much guarantee that your letter, or package, will get there. I can’t even begin to explain how big a blessing this is, compared to a lot of countries. Just ask people, around the world, how “safe” their mail is. By “safe,” for this example, we are just referring to the chances of your package actually being delivered. Meaning “not stolen.” Or, opened. Or, held for “security purposes.” Of all the things we write about, comparing the United States to how it’s like “over there,” this is near the top of the list. Just being able to send a letter, or package, “without incident,” is a huge blessing, which we so often, take for granted.

Only 55 pennies.
What a deal.

By the way, as a final note … if you don’t think we’re getting older:
To put in the “I Remember” column … To show how things have changed, yes, even here in our Country … I remember when there was no such phrase as “going postal.” This term was first used in the early 1990’s.

Blessings to you, and your family,
Richard. Vincent. Rose.

Here’s a direct link to the entire series so far:

Wealth Stored for the Righteous

Johnny Cash With the Statler Brothers: “The Battle Hymn of the Republic”

The Johnny Cash Show ran from June 7, 1969 to March 31, 1971 on ABC Television. It was taped at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee. Cash opened each show with his customary “Hello, I’m Johnny Cash” greeting.

The show included a “Country Gold” segment which featured legends rarely or never seen on network TV.

In 1976, CBS ran a revival of the show, “Johnny Cash and Friends,” from August 29 to September 20. The new show was taped at the newly constructed Grand Ole Opry House in Nashville. Aside from musical performances, this series also featured a greater emphasis on comedy, with Steve Martin and Jim Varney appearing as regulars, and with June Carter Cash performing several comedy routines as “Aunt Polly.”

Following “Johnny Cash and Friends,” an annual Johnny Cash Christmas Special series was launched, starting in 1976, with specials airing almost every year until 1985.

We share Johnny Cash, with The Statler Brothers, singing
“Battle Hymn of the Republic.”

The “Battle Hymn of the Republic” was written by Julia Ward Howe, and originally used the music from the song “John Brown’s Body.” The song was written in November 1861, and first appeared on the front page of the Atlantic Monthly in February of 1862. Editor James T. Fields, who paid her $5.00 for the piece, is credited with having given the song the name by which it is known today.

After the war, Mrs. Howe was active in the women’s suffrage movement. In 1868, she founded the New England Women’s Club and was one of the founders of the New England Women’s Suffrage Association. She was much in demand as a lecturer. Julia Ward Howe died October 17, 1910, at the age of 91.

This is from September 27, 1969.