Category Archives: QUOTES FOR ALL

Quotes, and, sometimes, quote collections, meant to encourage, inspire, and bless you.

3 Quotes: 1 Direction

Hi Friends:

Here are 3 quotes, all from “today,” which I either used, made up, or found:

The first one I have said many times, and, frankly, I think someone else “said it first,” but I’m not sure who.

However … once again, I used it today:

“If you follow the crowd … you’ll end up where they end up.”

Later today … I made this one up, so I’m sure it’s an original:

“Your entire body will end up where your steps take you.”

Tonight, I was writing on behalf of someone else:

I use a “flash-drive” to save material I get from one location, to “save it” until I get to another location. Often, it’s something I write at School, or something I’m working on at home, to take to School. I also have any number of small notes, in particular “sticky notes” of ideas I transfer from one location to another. To keep these together, and to protect them, I often put these small notes in a “sandwich bag,” in order to protect them, and to keep them separate in my “lunch bag,” which is one of those large insulated bags, with the zippered pouch in front. I also use this same sandwich bag to transport my flash drive from home to School, and vice-versa.

Tonight, I was working off of the flash drive, to complete something I needed to have prepared for School tomorrow. So, when I went to my lunch bag, that front zippered pouch, and pulled out the sandwich bag with the flash drive … as I reached in and pulled out the flash drive … this little note came out … somehow, stuck to my finger. It was a “small note” I had received, I don’t know when, at the end of a dinner at a Chinese restaurant. You know what I’m talking about …

You just never know where you will receive inspiration from … you just always have to “be on the lookout” …

I don’t know … it had to, at least, been months ago … maybe years ago … but, today … tonight … it just stuck to my finger …
Here’s what was written:

“If we do not change our direction, we are likely to end up where we are headed.”

Blessings,
Richard. Vincent. Rose.

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Quick Note to NFL (No Flag Loyalty) “Search Committee”

So, one of the tenets of success is to find out what successful people do, and then just “do what they do.”

No doubt that Sean McVay, head coach of the Los Angeles Rams, had a very successful season, and, there is no doubt that he’s a good football coach. In fact, for most of this season, I heard the NFL (No Flag Loyalty) TV analysts talk about how so many of the other teams in the League are “looking for the next Sean McVay.”
If you watched football, you heard it, too.

Don’t get me wrong: This is certainly not a “knock” against what he accomplished.
However … not one single time did I hear that same statement made about another coach.
Not once.

Here goes:
Maybe what they should be looking for is “another Bill Belichick.”

Remember:
“Everyone loves a winner. Until they start winning.”
R.V.R.

Quote: “Ready or Not, the Future Will Come”

Hi Friends:

I wanted to share this quote from a soon-to-be graduating Senior at our local High School.

One of our televisions in the Library is always tuned to a news channel, so current events are always “on display” for patrons to view, and, often, to share their thoughts about.
Today, like all days, the news was on, and, like always, we hear comments like “What’s this world coming to?” Or, concerns about “What’s going to happen next?” Needless to say, world political events, and especially the United States’ part in them, are always at the forefront of discussion, especially among adults.

I guess these are the same questions that mankind has had, to a certain degree, always. And, to a certain degree, “always” will have.

For a Senior graduating High School, getting ready to “step out there” for the first time, it does give a different angle to “all things become new.” I sensed the apprehension this young man had, as he contemplated the future … especially his future. We spoke about this, and then, “from out of nowhere,” seemingly grasping wisdom well beyond his years, he said this:

“The Future is going to come faster than you think it will.
The only thing is, “Are you prepared for it?”
Because only you can make your future become reality.
Everyone else can only help you from the sidelines.
Remember:
The future is going to come, whether you are ready or not.”

Quote

Today’s Quote: “Winners”

“Everybody loves a winner … Until they start winning.”
Richard. Vincent. Rose.

Quote: A Warning From Abraham Lincoln

“At what point shall we expect the approach of danger? … Shall we expect some transatlantic military giant to step the ocean and crush us at a blow? Never! All the armies of Europe, Asia, and Africa combined … could not by force take a drink from the Ohio or make a track on the Blue Ridge in a trial of a thousand years. At what point, then, is the approach of danger to be expected?

“At what point shall we expect the approach of danger? … Shall we expect some transatlantic military giant to step the ocean and crush us at a blow? Never! All the armies of Europe, Asia, and Africa combined … could not by force take a drink from the Ohio or make a track on the Blue Ridge in a trial of a thousand years. At what point, then, is the approach of danger to be expected?”
(Photo of President Lincoln at Gettysburg Before his Address)

Continuing Same Quote: ...

Continuing Same Quote:
…”I answer, if it ever reach us it must spring up amongst us; it cannot come from abroad. If destruction be our lot we must ourselves be its author and finisher. As a nation of freemen we must live through all time, or die by suicide.”
(Photo of President Lincoln as He Delivers His Second Inauguration Address)

 

Treasures: Hope, Promise, William Wordsworth, and “Daffodils”

“To look ahead … is to look back …
At those things we treasure most …
In the hope to see them again …”
Richard. Vincent. Rose.

Wow! That’s a good one!
Perhaps at no time is this more true than at this period of transition, which we call Spring.
Perhaps there is no time of year, except, perhaps, at a special holiday or gathering, at which these words are more true.

What is lovelier than a field of daffodils? Or … just a few?
As the stems push upward through the earth, doesn’t just the sight of their potential flowering push our spirits upward … When I think back to when I was growing up, it was always the daffodils which were the official “trumpets” of Springs arrival … which makes their “trumpet-looking” flower even more of a symbol, a herald, of things to come.

In the South, and other parts of the country, these beautiful arrivals are also called “Jonquils.”
I just learned, from asking around the web, that jonquils are a type of daffodil, so it is ok to call them by either name. I always, always have associated jonquils/daffodils with Easter, as I can never remember a time, growing up and later living in the South, when daffodils were not in bloom at Easter.

Of course, that has changed upon moving up North, and, especially this year. Among the coldest Winters on record (this is shared by a lot of places), coupled with an early Easter, there aren’t many flowers … ok … any flowers, in bloom here … In fact, everything that was visible yesterday (our yards, driveways, the roads) are now covered in snow, with more to come … but … the promise remains … the real, true hope remains … that, soon, the daffodils will arrive … and so will the rest of what they “usher in.”

Thank you, Jesus!

Right now, I’d like to “never mind!” that Easter has now passed, we are in the middle of a snowstorm, with more snow expected tonight … I saw several Robins in the yard this morning … I can at least see the top of the big rose bush in the back yard .. and … all over … here and there … daffodils are waiting … with patience I wish we had … to Spring forth and announce that our hope has been well founded …

One of the most famous poems about “Daffodils” was by William Wordsworth. What a great name! Here’s a brief biography of William Wordsworth … you will see again, how the greatest of writers have experienced the greatest of pain … and then, we’ll share the poem:

William Wordsworth

On April 7 (Wow! As of this writing, that is tomorrow), 1770, William Wordsworth was born in England. Wordsworth’s mother died when he was only eight years old—this experience would shape much of his later work. Wordsworth attended Hawkshead Grammar School, where his love of poetry was firmly established and, it is believed, he made his first attempts at verse. While he was at Hawkshead, Wordsworth’s father died, leaving him and his four siblings orphans.

After Hawkshead, Wordsworth studied at St. John’s College in Cambridge, and before his final semester, he set out on a walking tour of Europe, an experience that influenced both his poetry and his political sensibilities. While touring Europe, Wordsworth came into contact with the French Revolution. This experience, as well as a subsequent period living in France, brought about Wordsworth’s interest and sympathy for the life, troubles, and speech of the “common man.”

These issues proved to be of the utmost importance to Wordsworth’s work. William Wordsworth’s earliest poetry was published in 1793 in the collections An Evening Walk and Descriptive Sketches. In 1802, he returned to France, where he married Mary Hutchinson, a childhood friend, and they had five children together. In 1812, while living in Grasmere, two of their children—Catherine and John—died.

Wordsworth’s most famous work, The Prelude (1850), is considered by many to be the crowning achievement of English romanticism. The poem, revised numerous times, chronicles the spiritual life of the poet and marks the birth of a new genre of poetry. Although Wordsworth worked on The Prelude throughout his life, the poem was published posthumously.

William Wordsworth spent his final years settled at Rydal Mount in England, traveling and continuing his outdoor excursions. Devastated by the death of his daughter, Dora, in 1847, Wordsworth seemingly lost his will to compose poems. William Wordsworth died at Rydal Mount on April 23, 1850, leaving his wife Mary to publish The Prelude three months later.

The Daffodils
William Wordsworth

I wandered lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o’er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host, of golden daffodils;
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

Continuous as the stars that shine
And twinkle on the Milky Way,
They stretched in never-ending line
Along the margin of a bay:
Ten thousand saw I at a glance,
Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

The waves beside them danced, but they
Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:
A Poet could not but be gay,
In such a jocund company:
I gazed—and gazed—but little thought
What wealth the show to me had brought:

For oft, when on my couch I lie
In vacant or in pensive mood,
They flash upon that inward eye
Which is the bliss of solitude;
And then my heart with pleasure fills,
And dances with the daffodils.

Today’s Quote: Tom Brady

Tom Brady on Sports Illustrated Cover

“In Big Moments, it’s not about the plays.
It’s about the Players.”

NFL: Super Bowl XLIX-New England Patriots vs Seattle Seahawks: Malcolm Butler makes the catch