Category Archives: THE PRICE FOR FREEDOM

Posts and videos, from a variety of sources, to honor our Veterans, and to remind us all of what our Freedom cost.

The Price for Freedom-Video Thirteen: Amazing Grace/Amazing Images

“I would like to thank soldiers of past and present for their service and everything they have done. I don’t think we realize how much you boys have done.”

Our thirteenth video in this series features
“Amazing Grace/Amazing Images.”

Originally produced as a “Veterans Day” Salute, the only text in the video, other than the “thank you” which opens this introductions, are the words of a soldier, writing to his son:
” … I LOVE YOU VERY MUCH AND MISS YOU SO MUCH, MY HEART HURTS.
AND I HOPE TO GET HOME TO YOU AND MOMMY SOON … AND DON’T FORGET ME.
LOVE ALWAYS,
DADDY”

As we continue to remember, to “NEVER FORGET,” that

“The price for this freedom has been high …”

 

 

Advertisements

The Price for Freedom-Video Twelve-Andy Rooney on Memorial Day

“No official day is adequate for something like that …”

Our twelfth video in this series features Andy Rooney’s famous commentary on “Memorial Day.”

Andy Rooney was perhaps best known for his weekly broadcast “A Few Minutes with Andy Rooney,” which aired as part of the CBS News program “60 Minutes,” from 1978 to
2011. His final regular appearance on “60 Minutes” aired on October 2, 2011. He died one month later, on November 4, 2011, at age 92.

“I have more to remember on Memorial Day than most of you …”

Andy Rooney began his career in newspapers while in the Army when, in 1942, he began writing for “Stars and Stripes,” in London, during World War II.
In February 1943, he was flying with the Eighth Air Force, as a correspondent who flew on the second American bombing raid over Germany. He was the first journalist to reach the Ludendorff Bridge after the 9th Armored Division captured it on March 7, 1945.

Later, Andy Rooney was one of the first American journalists to visit the Nazi concentration camps, and one of the first to write about them.

For his service as a war correspondent in combat zones during the war, Rooney was decorated with the Bronze Star Medal (the Bronze Star), given for either heroic achievement, heroic service, meritorious achievement, or meritorious service in a
combat zone. He was also awarded the Air Medal, given for meritorious achievement while participating in aerial flight.

Andy Rooney’s “end-of-show” segment on 60 Minutes, “A Few Minutes with Andy Rooney” (originally “Three Minutes or So With Andy Rooney”), began in 1978, as a summer replacement for the debate segment “Point/Counterpoint.”

If you remember, Rooney was always seated behind a walnut table … his own table, which he had made himself.

Here’s Andy Rooney asking us to “consider what they did for us” …

Let us, also, now, continue to remember, to realize, that
“The price for this freedom has been high …”

 

The Price for Freedom-Video Eleven

“Remembering our fallen heroes
Their family and friends who bear
The burdens of great sorrow and pain”

Our eleventh video in this series gives us another opportunity to remember, to honor, and to think about, those who served, and, that those who serve “are not forgotten.”

“Who kept the faith
And fought the fight;
The glory theirs,
The duty ours”
Wallace Bruce
From the poem, “Memorial Day”

Let us, also, now, continue to remember, to realize, that

“The price for this freedom has been high …”

 

The Price for Freedom-Video Ten

“Ma’am … it’s about your husband … “

Our tenth video in the series will, painfully, longingly, remind us that the soldier’s thoughts are of home … those at home, are of the soldier … and, painfully, longingly, remind us that not all soldiers return home …

Yet, those at home … painfully, longingly, “never forget;” never forget the soldier …

Our tenth video in the series features this video from moments.org.
Here’s a direct link to their website:
moments.org

“Bless their hearts …”

Let us, now, remember, think aloud, that, “You are not forgotten.”

Let us, now, continue to remember, to “do everything we can,” to realize, that

“The price for this freedom has been high …”

 

The Price for Freedom-Video Nine

“I don’t regret this life I chose for me …”

Boy, do I understand the opening dialog, as the reporter asks the little girl,
“If you had a wish today, what would you wish for?”
Her answer:
“That my dad would be here.”

” … All I want is nothing more …”

Our ninth video in the series features images which will, like the rest, bring tears … but, of a different nature … tears of joy…

As the song describes the feelings of a soldier, wishing, wanting nothing more, than to be home…
“I’m going home, back to the place where I belong …”

Enjoy these video clips of soldiers surprising their loved ones with an unexpected visit home.

I’ve watched many parts of this video multiple times, and I trust that you will do the same, as we continue to think about the freedoms we enjoy, and why…

“Our sons are doing what they need to do, to protect the country.”

And, that, most importantly,
“The price for this freedom has been high …”

 

The Price for Freedom-Video Eight

How high the cost of our continuing freedom is!

Our eighth video in the series features bagpipes playing Amazing Grace, with images to remind us all, that

“The price for this freedom has been high … ”

This is one of the videos I discovered while researching Memorial Day.

There are no words I can add.

 

The Price for Freedom-Video Seven

“I just served as best I could.”

For the freedoms we enjoy,
“Thank you.”

“The price for this freedom has been high …”

For all who served,
“Thank you for your service.”

For all of us who understand the great sacrifices made,
“Thank you for your support.”

Our seventh video in the series features this video from moments.org.
Here’s a direct link to their website:
http://moments.org/

When I worked for a large retail store, a young man who worked in the same department was a recent Veteran of the War in the Middle East. Without exception, when he realized that a customer was a Veteran, he would reach out his hand, and, simply say, “Thank you for your service.” This young man went on to pursue public office, and I’ll never forget that hand reaching out, the handshake, and those words:
“Thank you for your service.”