Tag Archives: Christian quotes

Heroes of the Faith/ Hymn History: Phillips Brooks: Writer of “O Little Town of Bethlehem”

Phillips BrooksPhillips Brooks was a descendent of the earliest Puritans of Massachusetts. He studied at Harvard, taught for a short time in Virginia, and was ordained in the Episcopal Church about five years before the American Civil War began. He was one of the most eloquent preachers of his time, and due to his great oratorical skills, he served in prominent churches in Philadelphia and Boston (Trinity Church). He was for many years an overseer and preacher of Harvard University. Brooks’ close ties with Harvard University led to the creation of Phillips Brooks House in Harvard Yard. On January 23, 1900, it was dedicated to serve “the ideal of piety, charity, and hospitality.”
Phillips Brooks as young manIn 1877 Brooks published a course of lectures on preaching, which he had delivered at the theological school of Yale University, and which are an expression of his own experience. In 1878 he published his first volume of sermons, and from time to time issued other volumes.
Phillips Brooks was introduced to Helen Keller, when she was young, by Anne Sullivan. Brooks has been given credit for introducing Helen to Christianity.
Toward the end of his life, Brooks was chosen bishop of the Episcopal Church in Massachusetts. His entire life, he had touched many lives by his preaching as well as his personal Christian walk. In addition to his moral stature, he was a man of great physical bearing as well, standing six feet four inches tall.

“To know in one’s whole nature what it is to live by Christ; to be His, not our own; to be so occupied with gratitude for what He did for us and for what He continually is to us that His will and His glory shall be the sole desires of our life.”

As a boy, Phillips’ parents had hymn-sings on Sunday evenings, and by the time Phillips went to college, he knew over two hundred hymns. Many of these would be included in his sermons, and Phillips wrote poems and hymns himself.
Today Phillips is best remembered as the writer of the great Christmas hymn “O Little Town of Bethlehem,” which was written in l868. His inspiration for writing the classic hymn?
It was a Christmas Eve he spent in Bethlehem some years before, which, as you could imagine, left a lasting impression on his mind. He was inspired by the view of Bethlehem from the hills of Palestine, especially at night. Brooks loved children, and wrote this song for the children in his Sunday School when he was rector of Philadelphia’s Holy Trinity Church.
Lewis Redner, who was the organist and Sunday School superintendent for the church, wrote the music.
Brooks loved children and would often write letters to them. That explains why, when Brooks died on January 23, 1893, a five year old was upset because she had not seen her preacher friend for several days. Her mother told her Bishop Brooks had gone to heaven, and the child exclaimed, “Oh, Mama, how happy the angels will be.”

These words are placed over his tomb: “A preacher of righteousness and hope, majestic in stature, impetuous in utterance, rejoicing in the truth, unhampered by the bonds of church or state, he brought by his life and doctrine fresh faith to a people, fresh meanings to ancient creeds.”

 

Matthew Henry: Short Story and A Couple of Quotes

I am working on a short biography of Matthew Henry, the great writer, whose Bible commentaries are still being used today, and still, over 300 years later, are popular and considered standard for Biblical study. Here is another figure from Christian history, who also served as a Pastor. I find it striking now, looking at the brief histories I’ve written or gathered, of great men of the faith, that I never mentioned as part of their initial introduction, that they served as Pastors.

I came across this story, taken from Matthew Henry’s diary, which was written shortly after he had been robbed. I have to share this with you. It reminds me of something about what was thought about the early Christians, who had been converted through the preaching of the Apostle Paul: The amazing thing about these new converts was not that they did not steal anymore … it was that they did not want to steal anymore.
Here’s the short story from Matthew Henry:

“Many years ago, Matthew Henry, a well-known Bible scholar, was once robbed of his wallet. Knowing that it was his duty to give thanks in everything, he meditated on this incident and recorded in his diary the following:

‘Let me be thankful, first, because he never robbed me before; second, because although he took my purse, he did not take my life; third, because although he took all I possessed, it was not much; and fourth, because it was I who was robbed, not I who robbed.'”

Before I close,  please allow me to share just a few short quotes from Matthew Henry:

THOSE THAT WILL NOT YIELD TO THE FEAR OF GOD SHALL BE MADE TO YIELD TO THE FEAR OF EVERYTHING ELSE.

WE STAND NO LONGER THAN GOD HOLDS US AND GO NO FARTHER THAN HE CARRIES US.

IT IS BETTER TO BE SERVING GOD IN SOLITUDE THAN SERVING SIN IN A MULTITUDE.

Afflictions are sent to bring us to our Bibles and to our knees.Thanksgiving is good, but thanksliving is better.

Afflictions are sent to bring us to our Bibles and to our knees.
Thanksgiving is good, but thanksliving is better.

 

Apollo 8 Astronauts Read Creation From Genesis: Christmas Eve, 1968

“For all the people on Earth the crew of Apollo 8 has a message we would like to send you”.

44 years ago, December 24, 1968, Apollo 8 astronauts Bill Anders, Jim Lovell, and Frank Gorman took turns reading from Genesis Chapter 1,
as their spacecraft returned to earth, after from orbiting the moon 10 times. This was the first time in history that a manned spacecraft had orbited the moon.

It was during this mission that the astronauts took those memorable first pictures of an “earthrise,” the earth “rising” above the moon’s surface.
The spacecraft had actually gotten within 70 miles of the lunar surface.
Earth From Space-Apollo 8
I remember so clearly these events, as so many of you do, also. I remember hearing the astronauts reading from the Scriptures, to the entire world, as literally, everyone who had the means to do so, listened to God’s Word, from space. Being raised in a Christian home, I didn’t think anything unusual or “strange” about this event. I think, however, of how much our world has changed over these years since. I was a huge fan of space travel, as I think most of us were, who grew up during these early launches. I still get a thrill everytime I drive by the McAuliffe-Shepard Discovery Center, with its beautiful blue pryamid building and the life-size replica of a Mercury-Redstone rocket (replica of Shepard’s spacecraft) in front. We drove by this remarkable Center 2 times just last week! Growing up, I was also an avid stamp collector, so I was overjoyed when the U.S. Postal Service put the “earthrise” photograph on the stamp.
Apollo 8 StampIf you really want to think about how our world has changed, think about that stamp: The United States Postal Service, on the stamp, engraving, “In the beginning God …” Just take a moment, and think about that, in light of today. Wow! The “earthrise” picture, by the way, was taken on the 9th lunar orbit, and is still considered the most famous picture ever taken from space. I have several of these stamps, in mint condition, in my files. I just checked: This 6 cent stamp is on Ebay for 1.73 each.

Anyway, I wanted to find out more about how the Scripture reading came into “creation;” The story behind it. Here is the story from Frank Gorman’s Autobiograpy, entitled “Countdown, An Autobigraphy,” by Frank Borman with Robert J. Sterling/William Morrow, 1988. The book is still available through Amazon:
Countdown by Frank Gorman“There was one more impression we wanted to transmit: our feeling of closeness to the Creator of all things. This was Christmas Eve, December 24, 1968, and I handed Jim and Bill their lines from the Holy Scriptures.”
About six weeks before launch, a NASA official had called Borman. Noting that the crew would be circling the earth on Christmas Eve, he said, “We figure more people will be listening to your voice than that of any man in history. So we want you to say something appropriate.”
Without time to research the question himself, Borman appealed to his friend Si Bourgin, a NASA employee. Bourgin posed the question to Joe Laitin, formerly a United Press International reporter. Laitin’s suggestion pleased Borman. He had the words typed on fireproof paper. For the men, homesick for earth, the chosen words could hardly be more appropriate.
Bill Anders read Genesis 1:1-4.
Ji
m Lovell took the next four verses.
Frank Borman finished with, “And God said, ‘Let the waters under the heaven be gathered together unto one place, and let the dry land appear’: and it was so. And God called the dry land Earth, and the gathering together of the waters he called Seas: and God saw that it was good.”

As the men completed the orbit, Lovell said, “I don’t know who your two friends were, but they sure hit the target.”

And, now, as an extra special treat, here is the transcript of “The Apollo 8 Christmas Eve Broadcast,” from NASA National Space Science Data Center.Archived from the original on 19 April 2008. Retrieved 2008-04-12.
Following the transcript, is a dirct link to take you to the actual video recording of the entire message, as recorded live on December 24, 1968. Enjoy:

The Apollo 8 Christmas Eve Broadcast

Apollo 8, the first manned mission to the Moon, entered lunar orbit on Christmas Eve, December 24, 1968. That evening, the astronauts; Commander Frank Borman, Command Module Pilot Jim Lovell, and Lunar Module Pilot William Anders did a live television broadcast from lunar orbit, in which they showed pictures of the Earth and Moon seen from Apollo 8. Lovell said, “The vast loneliness is awe-inspiring and it makes you realize just what you have back there on Earth.” They ended the broadcast with the crew taking turns reading from the book of Genesis.
William Anders:
“For all the people on Earth the crew of Apollo 8 has a message we would like to send you”.
“In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.
And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep.
And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. And God said, Let there be light: and there was light.
And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness.”
Jim Lovell:
“And God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And the evening and the morning were the first day.
And God said, Let there be a firmament in the midst of the waters, and let it divide the waters from the waters.
And God made the firmament, and divided the waters which were under the firmament from the waters which were above the firmament: and it was so.
And God called the firmament Heaven. And the evening and the morning were the second day.”
Frank Borman:
“And God said, Let the waters under the heavens be gathered together unto one place, and let the dry land appear: and it was so.
And God called the dry land Earth; and the gathering together of the waters called he Seas: and God saw that it was good.”
Borman then added, “And from the crew of Apollo 8, we close with good night, good luck, a Merry Christmas, and God bless all of you – all of you on the good Earth.”

Here is a direct link to this transcript, and the actual video:
http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/planetary/lunar/apollo8_xmas.html

Really: Where Did The Phrase “Rob Peter to Pay Paul” Come From?

Well, here in the North Country, it was just recently property tax time … and the phrase “Rob Peter to pay Paul” just seemed to come up … coincidence or no?
So, I wondered where this phrase originated. It’s one of those sayings we use or say on a daily basis, without really knowing where the phrase came from, or maybe even what it really means.
And, really, why was it “Peter” and “Paul?” The (perhaps?) apostolic undertones could not be ignored.
I mean, why not “rob Tom to pay Jerry?” Or, any other two names “randomly” thrown in. I thought, perhaps, maybe it was not “random” at all, the choice of the names Peter and Paul. And, why was Peter the one robbed, rather than Paul?
Let’s face it: If Paul knew the source of such gain, he would not accept it, anyway. So, in light of especially that realization, where did the phrase originate, and what did it really mean-when it was first used? As a writer, and a teacher, the meaning of words, and their origin, are important to me.

Enter GOOGLE.

That’s what I did: “THE SEARCH” for “Where did the phrase ‘rob Peter to pay Paul’ come from?”

And, just to gain the potential ire of purists, the first source I used was “wiktionary.org.”
It had the answer that was the most common among all of the sources I researched:
It only strikes me now that, yes, the first time the phrase was used, had to do with paying taxes:
Etymology
The expression refers to times before the Reformation when Church taxes had to be paid to St. Paul’s church in London and to St. Peter’s church in Rome; originally it referred to neglecting the Peter tax in order to have money to pay the Paul tax.
Verb
to rob Peter to pay Paul
(idiomatic) To use resources that legitimately belong to or are needed by one party in order to satisfy a legitimate need of another party, especially within the same organization or group; to solve a problem in a way that makes another problem worse, producing no net gain.

An Idiom? I turned to “yourdictionary.com,” (“idioms column), where I discovered something new, something that I also discovered about the phrase, shared by other sources, which involved John Wycliffe:

What does “rob Peter to pay Paul” mean?
Take from one to give to another, shift resources. For example, They took out a second mortgage on their house so they could buy a condo in Florida—they’re robbing Peter to pay Paul. Although legend has it that this expression alludes to appropriating the estates of St. Peter’s Church, in Westminster, London, to pay for the repairs of St. Paul’s Cathedral in the 1800s, the saying first appeared in a work by John Wycliffe about 1382.

I found this bit of new information to be most amazing, especially as the proprietor of a Christian bookstore … so I turned to “amazingfactsworld.com,” which only mentioned the church tax as the origination:

What Does the Expression “Rob Peter to Pay Paul” Mean and Where Did the Idiom Come From?
In the mid-1700s the ancient London Cathedral of St. Paul’s was falling apart.
The strain on the treasury was so great that it was decided that it would merge with the diocese of the newer St. Peter’s Cathedral in order to absorb and use their funds to repair the crumbling St. Paul’s.
The parishioners of St. Peter’s resented this and came up with the rallying cry, they’re “robbing Peter to pay Paul.”
The expression is often used to refer to a bad deal.

But, no mention of John Wycliffe on this source … I needed answers … so, I turned to “answersyahoo.com”:

Resolved Question
Where does this saying come from? Robbing Peter to pay Paul?
Best Answer
Take from one to give to another, shift resources. Although legend has it that this expression alludes to appropriating the estates of St. Peter’s Church, in Westminster, London, to pay for the repairs of St. Paul’s Cathedral in the 1800s, the saying first appeared in a work by John Wycliffe about 1382.
“The expression ‘rob Peter to pay Paul’ goes back at least to John Wycliffe’s ‘Select English Works,’ written in about 1380. Equally old in French, the saying may derive from a 12th-century Latin expression referring to the Apostles: ‘As it were that one would crucify Paul in order to redeem Peter.’ The words usually mean to take money for one thing and use it for another, especially in paying off debts,” according to the “Encyclopedia of Word and Phrase Origins” by Robert Hendrickson.

I thought this was an excellent explanation … but then, I still wasn’t sure if there may be more to why the names “Peter” and “Paul” were chosen, and the phrase has lasted so long:
Maybe, I should turn to a British resource. So, I did. I went to “The Phrase Finder” over at
“phrases.org.uk. They had quite a lot of information, and included why these particular 2 names were chosen:

Phrase Dictionary – Meanings and Origins > Rob Peter to pay Paul
There’s a text, first published in 1661, that purports to explain the origin of this expression – Peter Heylyn’s Ecclesia Restaurata:
The lands of Westminster so dilapidated by Bishop Thirlby, that there was almost nothing left to support the dignity; for which good service he had been preferred to the see of Norwich, in the year foregoing. Most of the lands invaded by the great men of the court, the rest laid out for reparation to the church of St Paul – pared almost to the very quick in those days of rapine. From hence first came that significant by-word (as is said by some) of robbing Peter to pay Paul.
A 350 year-old text claiming to explain the origin of a phrase is usually almost as good as a smoking gun for etymologists. Regrettably, Heylyn’s understanding was flawed; the phrase was known long before 1661 and even before the birth of the 16th century cleric Thomas Thirlby. The ecclesiastical tome Jacob’s well: an English treatise on the cleansing of man’s conscience, circa 1450, includes the phrase in it’s original form:
To robbe Petyr & geve it Poule, it were non almesse but gret synne.
The expression may be even earlier than 1450. John Wyclif’s Selected English Works contains this text:
Lord, hou schulde God approve that you robbe Petur and gif is robbere to Poule in ye name of Crist?
There is however, some dispute as to the date of the above. It is reprinted in a Victorian book but the original is now lost. If it does indeed arise from Wyclif the date would be 1380. Others have speculated that a more realistic date is around 1500.
The expression was well enough established in English for it to have been considered proverbial by John Heywood when he published A dialogue conteinyng the nomber in effect of all the prouerbes in the Englishe tongue in 1546:
Rob Peter and pay Paul: thou sayest I do;
But thou robbest and poulst Peter and Paul too
The phrase was also in use in other European countries and was known in France by at least 1611, when Cotgrave produced A Dictionarie of the French and English Tongues:
Découvrir Saint Pierre pour couvrir Saint Paul [Strip Peter to clothe Paul]
The precise date is not the only aspect of this phrase that is somewhat uncertain. Scholars also disagree as to the thinking of whoever coined it. Given that any two names would work in a ‘rob X to pay Y’ proverb, why choose Peter and Paul? It has been suggested that the primary reason for Peter and Paul is the alliteration, i.e. the same reason that Jack was paired with Jill when they went up the hill. That may well be part of the story, but there’s surely more to it. The similarities between Saint Peter and Saint Paul go deeper than their sharing of the letter P.
The expression was coined at a time when almost all English people were Christian and they would have been well used to hearing Peter and Paul paired together. They were both apostles of Christ, both martyred in Rome and shared the Feast Day on 29th June. This commemoration now passes by with little mention, but not so in mediaeval England. The essence of the meaning of ‘rob Peter to pay Paul’ is the pointlessness of taking from one only to give to another who was similar. There are many churches of Saint Peter and Saint Paul in England and throughout Europe. It may not be the case that, as Peter Heylyn asserted, that the phrase arose from the borrowing of money from one church to fund another, but from the familiarity of the notion of Peter and Paul being alike and inseparable.

I really learned a lot from this source, and most of it I almost completely understood.

So, I hope this clears up the question for you. There were a lot of “back and forth” discussion websites which featured answers, but I chose the best 5 which I found.
Here are the links to the sources, which may be a great resource for your future searches for other phrases and work origins:

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/rob_Peter_to_pay_Paul

https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=1006050128383

http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/rob-peter-to-pay-paul.html

 

A Message of Thanks-Keep Looking Up

Hello and Blessings:
We just want to thank you all so much for visiting our blog!
Since we started, in May of 2012, we have been blessed to have thousands of friends visit us here, from all over the world.
So far, we have had visitors from a total of 99 different countries, and from every continent and region of the world.
We praise God for that, and for the opportunity to share with so many wonderful friends from, literally, all over (and, “under”).

Looking ahead … well, we’re not looking ahead, necessarily, … but, we certainly will keep looking up, and we encourage you all to do the same: As Jehoshaphat prayed, and what a great prayer recorded in 2 Chronicles 20: “… neither know we what to do: but our eyes are upon thee” (verse 12).

So, we wish to do all we can to encourage you, most of all, to make your relationship with Jesus just the way He wants, not the way you want … His will be done in you, and through you, to the glory of God … Allow me to say that, today, this year, we don’t need a new resolution … we need a new revelation … of Who Jesus is, and can be, in and through us …

“Now thanks be unto God, which ALWAYS causeth us to triumph in Christ, and maketh manifest the savor of his knowledge by us in every place” (2 Corinthians 2:14).
Why, yes, that does mean, also, in the workplace … and in our homes … even among our families …

Back to 2 Chronicles 20, this time to the words of Jahaziel:
“Be not afraid or dismayed … for the battle is not yours, but God’s … set yourselves, stand ye still, and see the salvation of the LORD with you … for the LORD will be with you” (15-17).

So, to all our friends, please have faith, believe, and act on it! We always say that, “When we act on faith, we’re not acting!” God, and God alone, has met all of our needs, all of this year. And, we still trust Him, because He hasn’t changed, nor has His love for us changed.
Gotta love that 2 Chronicles 20: “Believe in the LORD your God, so shall ye be established; believe his prophets, so shall ye prosper” (verse 20).

As the old “CBer’s” used to say, “10-4 on that” … (Yes, I remember the old CB craze) … I wonder if all that meant 2 Corinthians 10:4: “For the weapons of our warfare are not carnal, but mighty through God to the pulling down of strongholds.”
Gotta love that 2 Corinthians, too!

In closing, allow us to thank you again for joining us this year, and we do promise to do a better job in putting together more information about encouraging Pastors and their families … We welcome any encouraging words you’d like to send us to encourage both the Pastor, and the flock …

Closing # 2: We do encourage you to pray more, and to study your Bible more, so that you can be more … like Jesus!
And, please make a point to read those great stories from the Bible about the lives and actions of all of the great characters in our past, our relatives in the faith … I just finished studying about Moses, and Noah, and Abraham … can’t wait to read again the story of Joseph … and, so many others … their stories are there, just like we pray our stories will be here, to witness to, and encourage you all …
Please allow us to hear from you!
And, speaking of Abraham:
” … And I will bless them that bless thee …” (Genesis 12:3)

On behalf of Carol, and I, thank you again … and bless you all,
Ted
Freedom Unlimited Resources, LLC

Napoleon Bonaparte: Believer?

Napoleon-frontAt church, a friend handed me this quote, attributed to Napoleon Bonaparte:
“Alexander’s kingdom and my kingdom will ultimately come to naught. But, Jesus’ kingdom is indestructible, because His kingdom is ruled by the power of love.”
I had, in the past, heard that Bonaparte believed in the deity of Jesus.
I think that Napoleon, in his later years, had changed his views on many things, God included. It seems that the quotes I have been able to attribute to Napoleon, regarding his beliefs, came in his later years, especially during those moments of exile, when he must have had plenty of time to just think.

napoleon-sideI discovered this on the “www.adherents.com” website, with most of the information culled from Jesus Among Other Gods by Ravi Zacharias, 2000, W. Publishing Group, Nashville, Tennessee … quoting from Henry Parry Liddon, Liddon’s Bampton Lectures 1866 (London: Rivingtons, 1869), 148.

Apparently, Napoleon Bonaparte had a strong belief in God, but he voiced many criticisms of organized religion. Many quotes by Napoleon indicate a strong belief in Jesus Christ. Possibly Napoleon’s views changed over time, or possibly some quotes have been inaccurately attributed to him.
From: Ervin Shaw, “Napoleon Bonaparte: ‘Emperor’ to EMPEROR” webpage, posted circa 2000, latest addition 14 August 2005; in “Christian Testimonies” section of “The Truth . . . What Is It?” website (http://poptop.hypermart.net/testnapb.html; 
“I know men; and I tell you that Jesus Christ is not a man. Superficial minds see a resemblance between Christ and the founders of empires, and the gods of other religions. That resemblance does not exist. There is between Christianity and whatever other religions the distance of infinity…” So says Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1821), emperor of France.
Napoleon expressed the following thoughts while he was exiled on the rock of St. Helena. There, the conqueror of civilized Europe had time to reflect on the measure of his accomplishments. He called Count Montholon to his side and asked him, “Can you tell me who Jesus Christ was?” The count declined to respond. Napoleon countered:
Well then, I will tell you. Alexander, Caesar, Charlemagne and I myself have founded great empires; but upon what did these creations of our genius depend? Upon force. Jesus alone founded His empire upon love, and to this very day millions will die for Him. . . . I think I understand something of human nature; and I tell you, all these were men, and I am a man; none else is like Him: Jesus Christ was more than a man. . . . I have inspired multitudes with such an enthusiastic devotion that they would have died for me . . . but to do this it was necessary that I should be visibly present with the electric influence of my looks, my words, of my voice. When I saw men and spoke to them, I lightened up the flame of self-devotion in their hearts . . . Christ alone has succeeded in so raising the mind of man toward the unseen, that it becomes insensible to the barriers of time and space. Across a chasm of eighteen hundred years, Jesus Christ makes a demand which is beyond all others difficult to satisfy; He asks for that which a philosopher may often seek in vain at the hands of his friends, or a father of his children, or a bride of her spouse, or a man of his brother. He asks for the human heart; He will have it entirely to Himself. He demands it unconditionally; and forthwith His demand is granted. Wonderful! In defiance of time and space, the soul of man, with all its powers and faculties, becomes an annexation to the empire of Christ. All who sincerely believe in Him, experience that remarkable, supernatural love toward Him. This phenomenon is unaccountable; it is altogether beyond the scope of man’s creative powers. Time, the great destroyer, is powerless to extinguish this sacred flame; time can neither exhaust its strength nor put a limit to its range. This is it, which strikes me most; I have often thought of it. This it is which proves to me quite convincingly the Divinity of Jesus Christ.”

Now, these quotes, from www.giga-usa.com:

“Alexander, Caesar, Charlemagne and I myself have founded empires; but upon what do these creations of our genius depend? Upon force, Jesus alone founded His empire upon love; and to this very day millions would die for Him.”

“All systems of morality are fine. The gospel alone has exhibited a complete assemblage of the principles of morality, divested of all absurdity. It is not composed, like your creed, of a few common-place sentences put into bad verse. Do you wish to see that which is really sublime? Repeat the Lord’s Prayer.”

“All the scholastic scaffolding falls, as a ruined edifice, before one single word-faith.”

“From first to last, Jesus is the same; always the same-majestic and simple, infinitely severe and infinitely gentle.”

“If you (to General Bertrand) do not perceive that Jesus Christ is God, very well; then I did wrong to make you a general.”

“Religion is, in fact, the dominion of the soul; it is the hope, the anchor of safety, the deliverance from evil. What a service has Christianity rendered to humanity!”

“What a solace Christianity must be to one who has an undoubted conviction of its truth!”

And, finally, this, from www.wordproject.org:

“The Bible is no mere book, but a Living Creature, with a power that conquers all that oppose it.”
napoleon-horseback

 

Today’s Quotes: W. Clement Stone

stone

Prayer is man’s greatest power.

Be careful the environment you choose for it will shape you; be careful the friends you choose for you will become like them.

“If you are really thankful, what do you do? You share.”

Have the courage to say no. Have the courage to face the truth. Do the right thing because it is right.

Regardless of who you are or what you have been, you can be what you want to be.

Every great man, every successful man, no matter what the field of endeavor, has known the magic that lies in these words: every adversity has the seed of an equivalent or greater benefit.

Truth will always be truth, regardless of lack of understanding, disbelief or ignorance.

Aim for the moon. If you miss, you may hit a star.

 You always do what you want to do. This is true with every act. You may say that you had to do something, of that you were forced to, but actually, whatever you do, you do by choice. Only you have the power to choose for yourself.

There is little difference in people, but that little difference makes a big difference. The little difference is attitude. The big difference is whether it is positive or negative.

Here is a great resource for free quotes, which is where we got these quotes from W. Clement Stone. Here, you can browse quotes by authors, topics, etc.
Enjoy!

http://www.brainyquote.com/ 

 

Heroes of the Faith: Dr. David Livingstone Found by Henry Stanley

Once asked why he decided to be a missionary, Livingstone replied: “I was compelled by the love of Christ.”

Here’s his story, taken from Christianity.com:

For years, no one had heard from the Scottish missionary explorer, David Livingstone. In l866, he had disappeared into the East African interior, searching for the source of the River Nile. Livingstone’s reports of his earlier explorations in Africa had fascinated multitudes of readers at home. Once asked why he decided to be a missionary, Livingstone replied: “I was compelled by the love of Christ.”

His Missionary Travels and Researches in South Africa, published in 1857, told of treks totaling more than 20,000 miles back and forth across the African continent. His explorations provided valuable information about the people and geography of Africa’s interior. However, when he didn’t know, he guessed; and his dreams were often bigger than the facts; this cost a number of missionary their lives because they relied on his accounts. James Stewart (founder of Lovedale mission) was so disgusted with Livingstone’s personal life and misinformation that he threw one of his books into an African river.

All the same, Livingstone awakened the world to the horror of the Arab slave trade, which he called a “monster of iniquity brooding over Africa.” By publicizing the evil of slavery, Livingstone worked effectively to see it abolished. For every 20,000 slaves captured and exported, he estimated 100,000 Africans were killed, wounded, or died of disease on the slave trails. He wrote: “The many skeletons we have seen along the paths of the wilderness attest the awful sacrifice of human life that must be attributed to this trade in hell.”

In 1871, concerned that for five years no one had heard from Livingstone and eager to obtain a “scoop,” the New York Herald sent journalist Henry Stanley to find him. Landing in Zanzibar, Stanley traced Livingstone’s steps into the interior. To do so, he had to find his way (sometimes fighting) through hostile territory and overcome attacks of malaria, the jaws of crocodiles, mutiny and desertion.

After months of misery, learning that Livingstone was close, Stanley and his porters donned their best clothes. At last, on this day, November 10, 1871, they saw an old white man by the shores of Lake Tanganyika. Knowing this could be only one person, Stanley greeted him with his now world-famous comment: “Dr. Livingstone, I presume.”

The foods Henry brought with him saved Livingstone’s life, for he was desperately ill and able to eat only African porridge. “You have brought me new life,” said the missionary over and over. Unable to persuade Livingstone to leave Africa, Stanley joined him in exploring part of Lake Tanganyika and then returned to England. Unlike James Stewart, Stanley was impressed with Livingstone’s Christianity, and wrote: “It is not of the theoretical kind, but it is a constant, earnest, sincere practice…and it is always at work.”

Free Online Resource: The Literature Network

This is a great FREE online resource for all of us who love literature. Read books, essays, reference works, poems, short stories, quotes … and yes, they do have religious books and writings for you to enjoy. You can search by author, etc. They also have some great quizzes to test your knowledge of authors and literature.
Here is their statement from their home page:
“We offer searchable online literature for the student, educator, or enthusiast. To find the work you’re looking for start by looking through the author index. We currently have over 3000 full books and over 4000 short stories and poems by over 250 authors. Our quotations database has over 8500 quotes.”

Link to The Literature Network:
http://www.online-literature.com/

Today’s Quote: Faith and Job

Today, we were writing to a beloved customer in Virginia, when I noticed the quotes on this month’s calendar page here in the office.
Here’s what we wrote:

“… God has been faithful. And, He’s not done yet.
Our business principle really is from Genesis 12, that “I will bless them that bless thee.” And, we have been blessed. I am reminded of a quote on this month’s calendar page here in the office:
“Faith makes things possible, not easy.”
We like to say that “When we act on faith, we’re not acting.”
Also, at the top of the same calendar is Job 23:10:
“But He knoweth the way that I take: when he hath tried me, I shall come forth as gold.”
WOW! That’s a good one!
Please pray for us, for God’s will to be done in our lives. To think, say, and do the right things. And, to be allowed to bless as many people as He will allow.”

Blessings,
Ted and Carol