Tag Archives: Eres Tu

Eres Tu-Part Three: The Ray Conniff Singers

Hi Friends:
We first featured an instrumental version of this song. Here’s the link:
Eres Tu-Part One: The Guitars of Sonny James

Then, we featured the award-winning Spanish version of the song:
Eres Tu-Part Two: Winning Song for “Mocedades” in 1973

Now, we feature the English vocal version of the song, by the fabulous Ray Conniff Singers.
Plus … this version includes the lyrics/words of the song in English!

The words “Eres Tu” is translated “It’s You,” as in:
It’s You, It’s You, Eres Tu.

Joseph Raymond Conniff was born in Attleboro, Massachusetts, on November 6, 1916. His father was the leader/trombonist of the local Jewelry City Band and his mother played the piano. He learned to play the trombone from his father, and he studied music arranging from a course book.

He served in the U.S. Army in World War II. He joined the Artie Shaw band, writing many arrangements for him. He started working for Mitch Miller in 1954, at Columbia Records, working with several artists including Rosemary Clooney, Marty Robbins, Frankie Laine, Johnny Mathis, Guy Mitchell and Johnnie Ray. He wrote the arrangement for Don Cherry’s “Band of Gold” in 1955, which sold more than a million copies. Hit singles he backed with his orchestra included “Chances Are” by Johnny Mathis, and “A White Sport Coat” by Marty Robbins.

Early in his career, he produced records for Columbia’s Epic label under the name of Jay Raye, which stood for “Joseph Raymond.”

Between 1957-1968, Conniff had 28 albums in the American Top 40. Becoming a top-selling artist worldwide, he also was the first American popular artist to record in Russia, in 1974. In 1959, he started The Ray Conniff Singers, consisting of 12 women and 13 men. In 1966, when the album “It’s the Talk of the Town” was released, it included the biggest hit he ever had in his career:
“Somewhere My Love. “The album reached the US top 20 and went platinum, and Conniff won a Grammy. The single and album also reached high positions in the international charts. The first of four Christmas albums by the Singers, “Christmas with Conniff,” released in 1959, was also successful.

In 1979, Ray Conniff was hired to re-arrange and record a new version of “Those Were The Days” and “Remembering You,” the opening and closing themes to “All In The Family,” for its new spin-off, “Archie Bunker’s Place.”

Ray Conniff was in the music business for over 65 years, and he recorded over 100 albums, selling 70 million albums worldwide, and he would continue recording and performing until his death on October 12, 2002.

Enjoy the final segment of our series, as The Ray Conniff Singers sing “Eres Tu.”
Credit for the presentation is included at the end:

Eres Tu-Part Two: Winning Song for “Mocedades” in 1973

Hi Friends:

In Part One, we featured my favorite instrumental performance, “Eres Tu” by “The Guitars of Sonny James.” Here’s a link to that:

“Eres Tu” The Guitars of Sonny James.

So … Can a song, in which I don’t understand the words … become my favorite video?
Well … I searched and searched for a vocal performance of “Eres Tu” to feature in this short series …
I watched and listened to videos made all over the world … and, to me, this one is my favorite.

A brief history:
A Spanish singing group from the Basque Country, Mocedades represented Spain in the Eurovision Song Contest in 1973 with this song. Amaya Uranga, the Lead Singer in this video (born February 18, 1947 in Bilbao, Spain), spent 15 years with the group. She formed the group in the late 1960’s with eight members, which included her sister Izaskun, and her brother Roberto. After their success in this contest, the band launched a hugely successful music career in Spain and Latin America, and would go through several membership changes in the next years, becoming popular all around the world.

I just love this video!
Yes … even though I don’t know all the words, I have played this version of the song so many times that I can sing parts of it “by heart.”

All I know is that, for me, this incorporates all of the elements of a great song on video. As an old-time “radio man” I respect and admire a great performance. For me, this one delivers. To me, as an “Old-School” guy, I love the way they alternate between studio and live/stage performance.
Yes … when you watch this video, there is no doubt it comes from “back in the day.”
Yet, for me, “good is good,” regardless of time or place.
It has “back in the day” written all over it, and, for me, that seems to make me enjoy it all the more.

It’s like my favorite instrumental “came to life” and became my favorite music video.
I love the way they did this, showing clips of all of the singers, back and forth between “live” and studio … not missing a beat.
It reminds me of performing in front of very young children: They don’t get the jokes … they just know I am joking … and they love that.

So, I don’t understand the words, but it is such a great performance, I love it.

Enjoy Mocedades and “Eres Tu:”

Eres Tu-Part One: The Guitars of Sonny James

Hi Friends:

Growing up in North Georgia, my older sister would listen to a country music station, WDOD, out of Chattanooga, Tennessee. The announcer who did the mid-day shift was Jerry Rivers. If you remember the station’s ID jingle … “WDOD … On the banks of the Tennessee …” At the end of his daily shift, he would play this song, as he would voice-over his “thank yous” and “goodbyes.”

I never forgot this beautiful, haunting instrumental, with the background chorus. So, years later, I used this same instrumental to voice-over my own signoff. It was perfect to speak over, it was instantly recognizable, and it had a great “cold” ending.

The song “Eres Tu (Touch the Wind)” was originally a hit for the Spanish vocal group Mocedades in 1974, and was recorded in 1975 as part an easy listening guitar instrumental album by country music legend Sonny James, entitled “The Guitars of Sonny James.”

A few words about the great Sonny James (May 1, 1928 – February 22, 2016):
As singer, song-writer, and musician, Sonny James’ biggest hit was “Young Love,” which made it to the top of both country and pop music charts in January to February 1957. He was known as “the Southern Gentleman, and he had 72 country and pop-charted records from 1953 to 1983, including a 5-year streak of 16 straight Billboard #1 singles among his total of 26 #1 hits. Twenty-one of his albums reached the country top ten from 1964 to 1976. In 1957, Sonny James became the first country music recording artist to appear on “The Ed Sullivan Show.”

Sonny James was given a star on the “Hollywood Walk of Fame” in 1961. In 1967, he co-hosted the first Country Music Association Awards Show (with Bobbi Gentry), and was himself inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2007.

In February 1971, James was the first country music artist whose music went into space; he made a special music recording for the crew of Apollo 14. They later presented him with one of the small American flags that they had carried to the Moon.

On the “Guitars of Sonny James” album, notice that track B4 is “Paper Roses.” In 1973, Sonny James helped launch the solo career of Marie Osmond, by producing and arranging her first three albums, including her smash hit, “Paper Roses.”

This was the best recording I could find to share.
Enjoy “The Guitars of Sonny James” with “Eres Tu:”