Tag Archives: success

Success: Notes and Quotes

God doesn’t need our help. I think He is more than capable of handling things on His own.
He doesn’t ask us to do things for His benefit, but for our benefit.
Often, it’s not to help Him.
It’s to help us.

God will never call us to do a job, without supplying everything needed to do that job.
I put it this way:
Where God guides,
God provides.

And, oh, by the way, God doesn’t really need our money. He already owns everything. Giving is just that: Giving. Is it really more blessed to give than receive?
A question for another time, but if you really think about why it is more blessed to give than receive, then you are well on the way to the answer. It’s not a question of what’s in your wallet, but what’s in your heart. Your giving will follow your heart. And, God doesn’t need a paper trail. He knows who gives. And, who doesn’t. He also knows who can’t, but wants to. And, He knows who can, but doesn’t want to.
And, oh, by the way, more often than not … what we need to “give to the Lord” has nothing to do with money.

Obedience is still better than sacrifice.

Wait … I’m just checking the list of shared principles we jotted down and shared in a previous post, which the great Bible heroes shared: Let’s see: Faith, humility, courage, obedience, perseverance, patience, they spoke boldly, they listened. Let’s see. I’m trying to see if any of these had anything to do with how much money they had. Let’s see: God used all of these great heroes in a mighty way, and it had nothing to do with how much money they had. Does this mean that God can use me, in a mighty way, even if I don’t have a lot of money? It seems that God is more interested in what’s in our heart, than in what’s in our wallet.

Too many times, we are more interested in what is in God’s hand, than in what is in His heart.

There is a phrase I’ve heard many times “Out in the world.” I remember the first time that I heard this phrase, I think it was in reference to a particular church, and how much “money they had.”
Then, the last time I heard this phrase, I was in a Hardware store, and there was a discussion about, of all things, professional wrestling, and in particular, the owner of a particular wrestling organization. The exact same phrase was used to describe how much money this man has.
I wanted to, on both occasions, just yell out, how wrong these people were … that one of the great lies is just that … a lie … that it’s not true … here it is … I’d like to dispel this rumor right now:
“No one has more money than God!”

The question is never, “What can you do for me?”
It should always be, “What can I do for you?”
Which reveals a servant’s heart-Jesus’ heart.
If you want to be like Jesus, then be like Jesus.

Not to be served, but to serve.
I put it this way:
Serve To Soar
To Soar, Serve

I understand the thinking behind the phrase, “What Would Jesus Do?” One day, we’ll share the story behind how that all originated.
I think, however, and this may not sell as many bracelets, or bumper stickers, or become such a catch-phrase “out in the world” as WWJD, but I think, that many times WWJD is not the real question:
The real question is: WWJWMTD
We know what Jesus did.
How great a prayer it is when we pray, “Jesus, what do you want me to do?”
“What Would Jesus Want Me To Do?”
Did we just “come up with another one?”

(Please note post/publication date of 5/6/13)

Blessings,
Ted

 

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Success: Notes, Quotes, & Folks

For some now, God has laid it on my heart to do a series on success principles … not what you’re thinking … To look at great men and women, especially of the Bible, and in particular, the Old Testament … What principles, characteristics, did they share? What can we learn, and apply, from what they learned, and applied?

There’s an old saying that, to be successful, you look at what successful people are doing, or have done, and you do the same thing. “Copy them” would be another term that comes to mind. I have learned that if something is “an old saying,” there’s a reason it’s still around. Aren’t we supposed to “be like Christ?” Our goal should be to know Him first, and then make Him known to others. I’ve also learned that every “success principle” has its roots in Scripture. Man has taken it, changed it, used it, but these principles haven’t changed.

In no certain order, I’ll just list some of the first characteristics that come to mind, and I can see almost all of, if not all these, in every Biblical hero I can think of:
Faith, humility, courage, obedience, perseverance, patience, they listened, and they spoke boldly.

These were real people, who had real lives. They had emotions, thoughts, and feelings. They faced great challenges-and disappointments. They experienced great victory, and great loss.
They had family, friends, and enemies. They were surrounded by sinful people, and so often, a sinful nation. They were persecuted for their faith. They were mocked, made fun of-all the way up to imprisonment and death. They faced the loss of their family, their property, their status (Oh No! Not That!), even their lives.

The more I write, the more I realize that they were just like us.
But, what did they do, to overcome “all of the above?”

That’s quite a list. Yes, I want to be like Jesus, but He has given us others to learn from. I will always urge you to read your Bible: To pray more, read more, be more. I’ll never forget when, years ago, Carol was reading the Old Testament, when she was approached by someone who asked her, “What are you reading that for?” This was meant in reference to reading the Old Testament, in favor of the New. I have just finished a series of character studies on those great Old Testament saints. I am so glad we have them, and their stories, for our examples. After all, that’s exactly why they were written.

Just today, Carol was saying how awesome the first 6 chapters of Daniel were. I agree. How sad the day was, when I was first involved in teaching youth class. There were kids-teenagers-who were “raised in church” who did not know who Noah was. Who Moses was. Who Joseph was. Etc. How sad that was. I said then, and it’s funny, I have said this often over the past years: “When was the last time you heard a sermon on Moses? On Noah? On Joseph? On Daniel? On Joshua? The three Hebrew boys thrown in the fiery furnace?”

I’ll never forget, one day, I was reading to a boy, probably 8-10 years old, who I can honestly say had never been to church once in his whole life. I just happened to have a “Children’s Bible Story” book on the bookshelf, and I read him the story of Daniel in the lion’s den, and then story of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego. His eyes were as big as saucers; he was speechless, as he hung on every word, on the edge of his seat. Did I mention he had never been to church before? His reaction to the stories were the same as mine, when I read them again, only recently, and Carol’s reaction today.

What set them apart?
Because they were “Set Apart.”
Often, they set themselves apart, and often, God “put them apart.”
They were “set apart” to “play a part” in God’s plan.
I’m so glad they were, and that we have God’s Word to learn about them, and from them.

Blessings,
Ted